Books

Books

First prize in the raffle of life: The splendid way we were

Steve Rudd admits that if he was setting up a publishing company today, he wouldn’t necessarily call it the King’s England Press. “It might have potentially unpleasant nuances for some people,” he says. “They might think we’re sitting here in the office wearing brown shirts and saluting each other. All sorts of issues have been raked over by this Brexit malarkey.”

News
In Extremis author Tim Parks.

Novel thoughts on death, family and religious faith

In Extremis is a novel about death and family and religious faith, about fidelity and infidelity, about the tension created by the awareness of what one owes to oneself and what one owes to others. It is intelligent, comic, sad and at times disturbing.

Books

University releases poems to mark 50th

Poets at Leeds Trinity University have published an anthology to commemorate the institution’s 50th anniversary.

News
Jonathan Dimbleby, whose latest book examines the human drama of the Battle of the Atlantic. (Picture: Matt Austin).

Maritime battle that helped turn the tide of the Second World War

Jonathan Dimbleby’s latest book lifts the lid on the Battle of the Atlantic during the Second World War. Chris Bond talks to the broadcaster about this often overlooked wartime story.

Analysis
The Kingdom

Strange... How normal, intelligent people can believe something as unreasonable as the Christian religion

Emmanuel Carrère sets out his pitch early. At a rather French dinner party, one of his guests says: “It’s strange, when you think about it, that normal intelligent people can believe something as unreasonable as the Christian religion… even if you don’t share their faith, you take them seriously.”

Books
Ian McMillan

Ian McMillan: The last word...

This is the last Saturday column I’ll ever write. Goodbye! I’m off to the wastes of an uninhabited island north of the Arctic Circle to raise reindeer and make Yorkshire puddings from whale blubber. Okay, I’m joking. This isn’t my last column, but I’ve been thinking about how you start, continue, and then end a piece of writing and one way to start it is with a bit of a surprise to make the reader sit up and take notice. And that’s why I did the ‘last column’ thing.

Opinion
Faith story: Reverend Richard Coles, the former pop star who was ordained into the Anglican priesthood in 2005.  (Picture: Mike Prior).

Richard Coles - his journey from pop to pulpit

The Reverend Richard Coles was a pop star who became a priest. He talks to Chris Bond about his unlikely journey and why he believes Christianity still matters.

Analysis
Scarborough born author Susan Hill.  Picture by Andrew Higgins.

Trumped up row

At time of writing, the furore surrounding an article Susan Hill wrote for The Spectator threatens to overshadow the launch of this latest novel. In the piece Scarborough-born Hill explains why she pulled out of an event at a bookshop which refuses to stock Trump autobiographies while handing out perceived anti-Trump novels for free. She sees this as a form of censorship, but in turn has been criticised for non-attendance.

Books
Lincoln in the Bardo

Who or what is Bardo?

Let me make this clear and explicit at the outset: this is a very good, very entertaining, provocative and clever novel. But it is, I fear, not as good as one might hope. The undefined “Bardo” of the title is a kind of Limbo, where souls transition from reality to eternity, and where some of them linger, afraid or unwilling to leave behind the past. It is where young Willie Lincoln, son of honest Abe, finds himself, having succumbed to illness at the age of 11. The night after the funeral, his father, President of the United States comes secretly to visit the grave.

Books
Ian McMillan

Ian McMillan: I know my place

I’ve been thinking about the fact that, as readers, we don’t only read words on pages or on smartphones or on billboards or as subtitles on the bottom of a French film. The word ‘reading’ can be used for all sorts of things. We talk about reading a situation, so that when you walk into a room you can sense the atmosphere and you reach into your bag for a knife to cut it with. Some people say, of other people ‘I can read him/her like a book’ and as a child I often wondered what that meant, and I imaged my Auntie staring hard at my Uncle Charlie’s waistcoat to try and work out some semblance of plot or character development, and failing.

Opinion
Mohsin Hamid

Strangely real

Maybe Lewis Carroll is as good a guide as anyone to the world of today. Alice falls down a rabbit hole or walks through the looking-glass, and encounters a different, bizarre and confusing reality which has its own peculiar logic.

Books
Martin Bell

Martin Bell to headline new season of Yorkshire Post literary lunches

THE Yorkshire Post is delighted to announce two literary lunches in 2017 with war correspondent and author Martin Bell lined up as the first speaker.

Books
AUTHOR: Kate Garraway will be talking about her new book at York Library next week.  PICTURE PA PHOTO/ADAM LAWRENCE.

Kate Garraway: When you’ve flashed your crotch in front of the nation, it’s hard to get nervous about anything

As she approaches 50, TV and radio presenter Kate Garraway talks to Hannah Stephenson about her new book which explores modern middle age.

Books
A Great Place To Have a War

What really went on in Laos

Reporter and columnist Joshua Kurlantzick has written for publications as diverse as Rolling Stone and the Economist and is the Southeast Asia expert for Washington DC’s Council on Foreign Relations. He brings all his experience to this beautifully written and astutely crafted book on the so-called Secret War. Vietnam looms largest in most views of the Cold War’s proxy wars, but in taking us back to the Southeast Asia of the 1960s, Kurlantzick focuses on the landlocked kingdom of Laos, the country bordering China, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand and Burma, on what happened there, and on why that is so important in the international crises we face today.

Books
Ian McMillan

Ian McMillan: Imagine and tonic

Write about what you know, they say, and on the whole that’s good advice, although I reckon you should sometimes speculate about things you don’t know, places you’ve never been to, people you’ve never met. As a man, you could write from a woman’s point of view, and vice versa. And then there are things you know really well: how about looking at them from a completely different angle, seeing what you can mine from them that you’ve not noticed before?

Opinion
A portrait of Anne Lister

Game of Thrones producer takes on story of Yorkshire’s ‘first modern lesbian’

FOR A literary figure forgotten for generations, Anne Lister’s elevation to Bronte-like status is as hard to understand as the four million words she committed to paper.

Books
Barry Roper  amongst  his large collection of   Borneo and South East Asia books   at his   Eastgate bookshop in Beverley.

The secondhand bookshop which has an entire floor devoted to Borneo

Beverley’s Borneo Bookman – as I’ve heard Barry Roper called – is telling me about meeting headhunters. Never had any problem with them, he says. Saw a few heads in their long-houses. But no shrunken ones... It’s not perhaps a conversation you expect to be having in the shadow of Beverley Minster. Borneo, however, is never far away at the Eastgate Bookshop. Just browse the shelves. Here’s Among Primitive Peoples in Borneo. Here are The Home-Life of Borneo Headhunters and Headhunter’s DaughterA Story from a Borneo Long-house. And, in lighter mood, Jolly Old Borneo and Biggles in Borneo.

Books
Henry Normal at his Brighton home. 
Picture by Jim Holden.

How Henry Normal went from the Royle Family and Alan Partridge to poetry

He’s produced some of our best known TV comedy shows, but now Henry Normal has returned to his first love – poetry. Yvette Huddleston reports.

Books
The Yorkshire Dales

Yorkshire’s literary tourism trail

Everyone knows that books are good for the soul, but now it turns out that they are also providing a boost to Yorkshire’s tourism industry.

News
Ian McMillan

Ian McMillan: Trip round a block

I sit at the keyboard like a concert pianist about to animate some delectable Chopin; I crack my knuckles and I lean over to begin my artistic task. Of course, this is a laptop keyboard we’re talking about, not a piano one, and I’m just about to start writing my column for The Yorkshire Post magazine. I take a long glug of tea and begin.

Opinion
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