60 jobs lost at Leeds Bradford Airport after Monarch airline collapse

Dozens of jobs have been lost at Leeds Bradford Airport after the collapse of the airline Monarch.

Administrator KPMG last night announced that 1,858 of around 2,100 Monarch staff had been made redundant.

Passengers from the first replacement Monarch flight land at Leeds Bradford Airport

Passengers from the first replacement Monarch flight land at Leeds Bradford Airport

Today it confirmed that 60 of those who had lost their jobs were based at Leeds Bradford Airport.

The Civil Aviation Authority organised chartered flights back to Leeds from Turkey and Italy yesterday to start bringing home the 110,000 passengers stranded abroad.

As the first passengers arrived at the airport, Leeds North West MP Alex Sobel voiced concerns about the jobs lost locally.

"I am going to press the government, the aviation minister and the Department for Work and Pensions to put things into place to see if other airlines can take on staff and ensure we replace flights, so there isn’t an issue for these staff or for Leeds Bradford Airport.

Aviation minister Lord Callanan fields questions

Aviation minister Lord Callanan fields questions

“The first two weeks it’s all about getting people home, after that we need to look closely at ensuring everybody has got a job who had a job at Monarch, and ensuring Leeds Bradford Airport replace those flights, replace that loss of income, and this airport is not affected."

Staff remaining in their jobs will help with the administration process and the massive repatriation programme now under way.

Around 13,000 Monarch passengers will be flown back to the UK each day over the next fortnight.

More than 500 passengers returned via Leeds yesterday, with thousands more expected in the days ahead.

Passengers arrive at Leeds Bradford Airport

Passengers arrive at Leeds Bradford Airport

Mr Sobel, who met passengers flying in from Turkey and Italy, said: "Passengers were quite happy when they got here, the flight was only delayed for about two-and-a-half hours. The important thing was that they got information.

“The big message is if you know somebody who is on a Monarch flight or on a Monarch holiday, let them know to look at the website or ring the number to find out what’s taking place. Very quickly, the Civil Aviation Authority have arranged a lot of chartered flights, and most people will be able to get home on the day they were meant to get home."