ACM moves headquarters to cope with growing demand

Jerry Boxall
Jerry Boxall
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A COMPANY that carries out research which could help to find treatments for cancer has moved its European headquarters to a new home in Yorkshire.

ACM Global Central Laboratory has moved its base from Clifton Moorgate near York to a new, bigger home in Fulford, North Yorkshire.

ACM Global, which has its head office in Rochester, New York, said that the move was in response to growing demand for the company’s clinical trials testing services in Europe, South Africa and the Middle East. The new facility has 14,500 square feet of laboratory and office space, which is nearly twice the size of ACM Global’s previous facility in York.

“Our new facility enables us to continue our growth in the European market” said Jerry Boxall, managing director, Europe at ACM Global Central Labora- tory.

“Expansion of our European laboratory hub represents a significant investment by our company, driven by our growth over the last several years,” said Angela J Panzarella, the president of ACM Medical Laboratory Incorporated, which is the parent company of ACM Global Central Labora- tory.

“We have enjoyed robust growth in our European and global business, and the new facility represents our commitment to the region and to continuous improvement of the services we offer our clients.”

Mr Boxall said that the company’s 75-strong York operation would be able to carry out a broader range of clinical trials as a result of the move.

It’s contracted to carry out work for a number of medical clients, and the research could help to find treatments for conditions such as cancer.

Ms Boxall stressed that its trials did not involve animal experiments.

Apart from ACM Global’s laboratory operations, the new HQ can accommodate data analysts, project managers and quality assurance specialists.

Altogether, ACM Global performs 20 million diagnostic tests every year.

The new laboratory will be officially opened on January 17, 2013, with a ribbon-cutting cere- mony.