Blade takes bow from centre stage as poppies take its place

Art work Blade, a 250ft-long (75m) wind turbine, which is now returning to the city's Alexandra Dock
Art work Blade, a 250ft-long (75m) wind turbine, which is now returning to the city's Alexandra Dock
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It has been one of the most talked about features of City of Culture so far, dominating Hull’s Queen Victoria Square with its vast presence.

Countless selfies have been taken alongside the 250ft Blade, as have lively debates about whether it is really art.

Blade, when it was being installed in Queen Victoria Square in January

Blade, when it was being installed in Queen Victoria Square in January

Love it or loathe it, by tomorrow it will have disappeared, as a small army of engineers are due to work throughout the night to return it to Alexandra Dock, reversing the process it went through in January.

Once again traffic lights and lamp posts will have to come out to allow the behemoth to inch its way back through the city centre’s narrow streets and onto the A63.

The blade will still be able to be seen - but from the other side of a mesh fence on a footpath which runs alongside the Siemens site at Alexandra Dock.

Siemens blade factory director Jason Speedy said: “We’re delighted Blade has proven so popular, with local residents and visitors to Hull alike.

“This project has been a key part of our contribution as a City of Culture Major Partner and we’re really pleased it has had such an impact, including through media coverage that has helped to promote Hull around the world.

“We would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the artist, Nayan Kulkarni, whose idea it was to present one of the first turbine blades made at our factory in Hull as a huge work of art in the heart of the city.

“His brilliant concept has been embraced so positively and helped the year get off to a flying start.”

The blade is being replaced this week with part of the spectacular sculpture of ceramic poppies which drew huge crowds to the Tower of London in 2014. Weeping Window will be on display at the Maritime Museum, in Queen Victoria Square, from this Friday.