Boat comes in for £110m clean-up campaign

A huge 1.2km pipe arrives by boat to Bridlington's South Beach, part of a �40 milliion investment to the town's bathing water
A huge 1.2km pipe arrives by boat to Bridlington's South Beach, part of a �40 milliion investment to the town's bathing water
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BATHERS can look forward to seawater quality being better than ever after an £18m pipe was eased into position yesterday after a long and arduous journey.

The pipe, which travelled over 700 miles from Norway to Bridlington via Billingham Docks, is the final part of a wider £110m investment by Yorkshire Water which aims to bring beaches in line with new European directives, which involve much stricter water quality tests.

Thought to be the longest pipe ever brought into the resort, it will act as a coastal outfall, transporting water and untreated sewage back into the sea only in “exceptional” weather events.

The work has seen half a million litres of storage created inland, more stormwater treated at the treatment works and combined sewage outfalls being redirected from the Gypsey Race which runs into the harbour.

Bridlington South Beach only met the “mandatory” minimum standard this year and it will take four years to reach the new “excellent” standard, which is twice as stringent as existing standards.

But that will still depend on targeting pollution coming from other sources – septic tanks, wrongly connected domestic plumbing – and even dogs and seagulls.

Lee Pitcher, from YW, said: “All these sources have to be tackled so come 2018 we will be in a position to achieve an excellent standard. You can build big tanks and pipes but the small things like septic tanks and missed connections are around education.”

The pipe, whose delivery was delayed for months because of the lack of a clear weather “window”, now has to be connected to the pumping station and covered over.