Chance to stop off at iconic train stations as part of new exhibition

Ed Bartholomew, senior curator of railways and research at the National Railway Museum, looks at a keystone from Thornaby Station in 1882, which is part of the Destination Station exhibition at the museum in York. Picture Tony Johnson
Ed Bartholomew, senior curator of railways and research at the National Railway Museum, looks at a keystone from Thornaby Station in 1882, which is part of the Destination Station exhibition at the museum in York. Picture Tony Johnson
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Most of us have visited a railway station and now a new exhibition in York is centred around some of the country’s most iconic.

The National Railway Museum’s latest exhibition Destination Stations to the public, taking visitors on a fascinating journey through the evolving architectural history of Britain’s railway stations, exploring the changing roles and appearances of some of the UK’s best-known landmarks throughout history.

It tracks the development of railway stations over time: from the rudimentary stopping points of the 1830s, the Victorian architectural masterpieces which coincided with the railway boom, the functional passenger hubs of the 20th century, through to the iconic modern-day stations

Destination Stations marks the first time Network Rail has loaned material from its extensive archives to a museum, and exhibition visitors can view historic architectural plans of iconic stations including London Bridge, Euston and Glasgow Central. Destination Stations runs to January 24. For more information see nrm.org.uk/destination-stations.