Cock-a-doodle-don’t! Neighbours get the bird over dawn chorus

Picture: Ross Parry Agency
Picture: Ross Parry Agency
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Feathers have been ruffled by a noisy cockerel in an East Riding town - leading to demands for a ban on the birds in built-up areas.

More than 20 residents have in Brough signed a petition over the cockerel at a house on Wold View and its “annoying” screeches.

Although already subject to a ‘bird ASBO’ - it only supposed to be allowed out at 9am weekdays and 10am at the weekend - neighbour Martin Credland told East Riding councillors that as he was leaving home this morning “it was giving ten bells.”

East Riding Council launched an investigation after Mr Credland complained six months ago.

Sound equipment was installed in his house and an officer visited several times to take noise readings - but they concluded a wood pigeon they had picked up on the recording was even noisier.

But Mr Credland insisted today wood pigeons were the “norm” and cockerels were “not native and not acceptable in the neighbourhood.”

Mr Credland, who is also chairman of Elloughton cum Brough town council, said: “When we bought the house 18 years ago the wood pigeons were part of it. The cockerel has a different noise and tone, it’s more annoying.

“The council came to an agreement with them which they don’t 100 per cent adhere to, it has been breached many times.

“I’ll get up in the morning and when I come back three hours later it’s at it again.”

He told the environment and regeneration overview and scrutiny committee meeting at County Hall, Beverley: “We consider it to be a statutory nuisance under the Environmental Protection Act 1990. These birds should not be allowed to be kept in a built-up area.

“I believe the East Riding should develop a policy banning cockerels in the community to stop further people being subject to this incessant noise.”

Although the committee decided to ask for a full report to its meeting in October at least one councillor was unmoved by Mr Credland’s plight.

UKIP councillor David Robson said in Bridlington they had to put up with thousands of seabirds starting to call before the crack of dawn, and the golf clubs had to use repeating guns to stop them roosting at night, adding: “One cockerel to my mind is nothing to that.”