Don’t suffer in silence about bedwetting

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BEDWETTING is still a taboo issue for worried parents, a report has found.

Over half (60 per cent) of parents in Leeds and the surrounding areas have never talked to other mums and dads about their child wetting the bed, with that figure hitting more than 70 per cent in some cities.

Furthermore, 44 per cent of parents in the region also admitted taking the precautionary measure of reducing their child’s drinks before bedtime, ahead of talking it over with them.

Despite more than half a million children suffering from the common condition in the UK, the study, conducted by bedwetting experts DryNites, shows parents continue to keep their child’s bedwetting quiet.

Parents admitted feeling upset and stressed about how bedwetting is affecting their child, with many worried their infant is unhappy, embarrassed and put off having sleepovers with friends.

Child psychologist Emma Kenny, said: “While your child wetting the bed can be quite distressing, parents need to reassure their children that this is a very normal, natural part of growing up, and they are in no way at fault.

“Children who are experiencing bedwetting need support and encouragement, and this is more likely to happen if their parents feel able to discuss the subject.

“Bedwetting regularly affects a fifth of five-year-olds, so it’s a lot more common than many parents might think.

“By talking about it to their children, other parents and professionals, worries ease and parents get the support they need to reassure their child.” With 23 per cent of parents who have a child aged between six and eight-years-old blaming themselves for their child’s bedwetting, as well as some admitting the issue makes them tired and frustrated, this is all the more reason to take the taboo out of the issue.

With a quarter who have a child aged between six and eight-years-old continue to blame themselves for their child’s bedwetting, as well as some admitting the issue makes them tired and frustrated, this is all the more reason to take the taboo out of the issue. DryNites, who spoke to more than 1,000 parents across the UK, are aiming to break down the barriers surrounding bedwetting by getting mums and dads talking about the issue with their children and other parents.

Stephanie Madrell, DryNites brand manager, said: “Bedwetting is just as common as asthma or eczema in children, but parents are afraid to talk to each other openly about it.

“By getting it out in the open and discussing it, parents will find there is a lot of advice and support out there that will help them get their child through this phase of development.”

The most common ways in which bedwetting affects children aged between three and 16-years-old, according to their parents, are: embarrassment (53 per cent), unhappiness (28 per cent), frustration (12 per cent), anxiety (25 per cent) and confusion (22 per cent ).

Parents’ biggest concern about their child’s bedwetting is that it could affect their child’s self-esteem (35 per cent), followed by concerns that they may not want to stay over at friends’ houses (13 per cent). If your child is experiencing frequent bedwetting and is finding it upsetting, it’s recommended that you contact your GP for advice.

A normal part of growing-up

In England, it’s estimated that:

One in five five-year-olds regularly wets the bed (regularly is defined as at least twice a week)

One in 10 seven-year-olds regularly wets the bed

One in 14 10-year-olds regularly wets the bed

One in 100 18-year-olds regularly wets the bed

Bedwetting is slightly more common in boys than in girls

Bedwetting usually only becomes a concern in children who are five years of age or over and who are wetting the bed at least twice a week

If you are concerned contact your GP for advice.

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