Dominic the human calculator takes on world and shows how to win at maths

Ten-year-old maths genius Dominic Seaward from Bramhope, Leeds
Ten-year-old maths genius Dominic Seaward from Bramhope, Leeds
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A TEN-year-old “human calculator” has become the world’s top Mathletics champion.

Number whizkid Dominic Seaward has been given the name by his classmate because of his astounding abilities.

The Bramhope Primary School pupil has already sharpened his number skills with a handful of tests by Mensa and has now beaten off competition from schools in China, South Africa and Australia to become the Mathletics World Champion.

It also comes in handy having Dominic’s calculating skills in the Seaward family.

The youngster from Leeds helps to work out the cost of his mother’s shopping before the check-out assistants without the help of a calculator.

Dominic said: “It’s quite embarrassing that my friends all call me the human calculator. I just like doing all of the sums in my head.

“I was really proud to be the world champion because a few teachers were joking that they wouldn’t be happy until I came first.”

The youngster beat the stiff competition during the Mathletics event – an initiative run in schools to help support children learning maths.

But outside school Dominic likes nothing better than playing with his toy cars and watching Top Gear and Doctor Who.

His father Robert said: “The school have been very supportive and Dominic is already doing high school work as well that the teachers have set him.

“We don’t want to push him too much but he comes in very handy. He tells the lady in the shop how much the shopping will cost and how much change he wants.

“Sometimes when we wander around the shops he will say that something is three pence cheaper at another store.

“Dominic just picks up stuff extremely quickly, especially his times tables.”

Dominic already has plans for a bright future which he hopes will test his number crunching skills.

He added: “Maybe one day I could discover a new type of way to do maths.”