It’s a fair cop as visitors get 
to see policing’s golden age

Harry Corps, a volunteer at the  Ripon Police and Prison museum, dressed in 1830s police uniform, with model police vehicles, left to right, a 1950s Ford Anglia, a 1960s  Morris Minor dog van and a 1969 Ford Transit. Pictures: Gary Longbottom.
Harry Corps, a volunteer at the Ripon Police and Prison museum, dressed in 1830s police uniform, with model police vehicles, left to right, a 1950s Ford Anglia, a 1960s Morris Minor dog van and a 1969 Ford Transit. Pictures: Gary Longbottom.
0
Have your say

IT offers a fascinating glimpse into policing in the past, to the days when officers would commandeer a passing car in order to chase after the villains.

Cop Cars, at Ripon’s Prison and Police Museum, makes use of its extensive collection of model police vehicles. And it gives an insight into policing through the decades, featuring vehicles from 1915 Model T Fords to BMW 5 Series cars.

Sam and Rowan O'Malley, aged four and six, from Ripon looking at Copperton, a model village created to teach police officers how to recognize traffic violations.

Sam and Rowan O'Malley, aged four and six, from Ripon looking at Copperton, a model village created to teach police officers how to recognize traffic violations.

There is also a chance to take a closer look at ‘Copperton’, a model village used by West Yorkshire Police for road safety training, and see how long it takes to spot the hazards hidden within its streets.

Younger children can play with TOMY vehicles and take part in ink stamping activities.

The museum reveals the harsh conditions of Victorian prison regimes. Housed in a building which formed part of the former House of Correction and Liberty Gaol, it is packed with displays of prison and police uniforms and artefacts.

Cop Cars runs until November 30 and the museum, in St Marygate, Ripon, is open daily from 1pm to 4pm (10am – 4pm during school holidays).

Admission is £5 for adults, concessions £4.50, children £3.50 and under 5s free.