More power for shareholders as Swiss vote to curb ‘fat cat’ pay packages

0
Have your say

Swiss voters voiced their anger at perceived corporate excesses by approving measures to boost shareholders’ say on executive pay.

Some 68 per cent of voters backed the “Rip-Off Initiative”, with 32 against, according to projections by Swiss public television station SRF.

The outcome of the referendum was considered a foregone conclusion after opinion polls in recent months showed strong public support for the initiative. News that the outgoing board chairman of Swiss drug maker Novartis AG, Daniel Vasella, was due to receive a leaving package worth 72 million Swiss francs (£50m) fired up public sentiment against “fat cat” bosses.

Swiss lawmakers will now have to draft a law giving shareholders the right to hold a binding vote on all compensation for company executives and directors. The law will also ban “golden hellos” and “goodbyes” – one-off bonuses that senior managers sometimes receive when joining or leaving a company.

It also promotes greater corporate transparency, for example by requiring that all loans to executives be declared to shareholders.

The measure targets all Swiss-based companies as long as their shares are publicly traded. Breaching the rules could lead to a fine of up to six annual salaries and up to three years in prison.

“It’s a powerful signal,” said Thomas Minder, an independent MP and businessman who was one of the main forces behind the Rip-Off Initiative.

Opponents conceded that their efforts to warn voters of the possible risks to the Swiss economy had failed.“We will respect the will of the people,” said Pascal Gentinetta, chairman of the powerful business lobby group economiesuisse.

But Christa Markwalder, an MP with the pro-business Free Democratic Party, said foreign firms could now think twice about moving their headquarters to Switzerland, which has attracted firms such as oil rig owner Transocean Ltd., fire and safety company Tyco International, and a bakery conglomerate Aryzta AG thanks to its comparatively low taxes and light-touch regulation.

Back to the top of the page