Museum honours record-breaking success of world-famous Black Dyke Band

Band member and cornet player, Keith Britcliffe, in the museum.
 PIC: Lorne Campbell/Guzelian
Band member and cornet player, Keith Britcliffe, in the museum. PIC: Lorne Campbell/Guzelian
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IT IS one of the oldest and best-known brass bands in the world.

And now a new museum has opened in the band room of the world-famous Black Dyke Band in Queensbury, near Bradford.

The new heritage centre includes uniforms, sheet music, trophies and uniforms connected to the band, which is the world’s most successful brass ensembles.

It was formed in 1855, and for most of its history was the sponsored works band of John Foster and Son Ltd, cloth makers.

Two of the band’s famous former principal cornet players, William Lang and Maurice Murphy, achieved the position of Principal Trumpet with London Symphony Orchestra.

The band has made more than 350 recordings, including one of the first brass band recordings more than a century ago in 1904.

In 2014, the band won the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain for a record 23rd time, and the British Open Championship for a record 30th time.

The Black Dyke Band has also won the European Championships a record 13 times, its most recent victory in 2015.