Oldest butcher’s shop, whose customers once included Michael Caine, may now face the chop

Butcher Frank Fisher is still running his own business at 86. Picture: Ross Parry Agency

Butcher Frank Fisher is still running his own business at 86. Picture: Ross Parry Agency

1
Have your say

Britain’s oldest butcher, whose shop has been handed down five generations over 160 years, says it may finally face the chop, because he doesn’t have an heir to pass it on to.

Frank Fisher, 86, still running the business, Fisher & Son family butchers on High Street in Dronfield.

It was established in 1702, and Mr Fisher’s great-grandfather, Jim, took it over in 1852 before retiring in 1900.

His grandfather, William, then took charge and ran it until 1955, when he passed it to Frank and his father, Percy, in 1956.

“I have not had a day off since really,” Mr Fisher said. “Apart from going away on the odd golf holiday once in a blue moon.”

Mr Fisher never married and he does not have children.

Frank's family in the 1900s

Frank's family in the 1900s

Asked what will happen to he shop, he said: “I am not sure what will happen. I think I have done well to stay open for this long.

“It is a struggle - it is no use pretending anything else.

“A lot of my customers are older and when they disappear I do not get the young customers.”

One customer he did entertain was the actor Michael Caine, who lived in Dronfield in the early 1960s with his first wife, the actress Patricia Haines.

Frank's parents second and fourth from the left

Frank's parents second and fourth from the left

Mr Fisher said: “He would come in and collect his joint of meat. He had been in three or four times before I knew who he was.

“It was only when two girls came across from the bakers with autograph books that I realised he was famous.”

The butcher’s other brush with fame involved the artist, Pablo Picasso, although they met only on the steps of Sheffield Town Hall.

“It was cold and wet in 1948,” Mr Fisher said. “I recognised him because he was involved in the World Peace Community.

“I went across to him and said ‘hello’ and asked if he liked Sheffield.

“He said a few words but not much. I was only 17 or 18.”

Back to the top of the page