Colombia’s plane crash tragedy and the chilling echoes of Munich

Police officers and rescue workers search for survivors around the wreckage of a chartered airplane that crashed in La Union, a mountainous area outside Medellin, Colombia, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. The plane was carrying the Brazilian first division soccer club Chapecoense team that was on it's way for a Copa Sudamericana final match against Colombia's Atletico Nacional. (AP Photo/Luis Benavides)

Police officers and rescue workers search for survivors around the wreckage of a chartered airplane that crashed in La Union, a mountainous area outside Medellin, Colombia, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016. The plane was carrying the Brazilian first division soccer club Chapecoense team that was on it's way for a Copa Sudamericana final match against Colombia's Atletico Nacional. (AP Photo/Luis Benavides)

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THE chilling echoes with Munich, an unspeakable sporting disaster that claimed the lives, amongst others, of revered South Yorkshire footballers

Tommy Taylor, Mark Jones and David Pegg, were self-evident as news emerged of a tragic plane crash in Colombia involving players, officials and journalists from Brazil’s Chapecoense team.

Like the immortal ‘Busby Babes’ in 1958, this was a team of relatively young players representing their country in the latter stages of a prestigious continental tournament when calamity struck, and their deaths have already been widely mourned by the global football family.

It also puts into context tantrums about disputed decisions or water bottles kicked in frustration. Such unsporting outbursts are not even trivial when compared to the loss of an up-and-coming side which, by all accounts, had the world at its feet.

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