YP Letters: Brexit won’t change daily life significantly in near future

Prime Minister Theresa May hosts the President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz for talks at 10 Downing Street,  London, over Brexit.
Prime Minister Theresa May hosts the President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz for talks at 10 Downing Street, London, over Brexit.
0
Have your say

From: Mike Smith, Birkby, Huddersfield.

Mr Richard Reed is probably right when he says it will be at least two years before the impact of Brexit is felt (The Yorkshire Post, September 16). However his several points supporting his predictions of doom and gloom are highly speculative and reflect the narrow thinking of Remainers. The reality is that nothing significant resulting from Brexit is likely to change our daily lives in the near future.

Trade with Europe will continue as usual as long as our trading account with the EU remains in deficit because they are unlikely to bite the hand that currently feeds their economy. Any worthwhile benefits to manufacturing industries from the existing raft of EU directives that were conditional on trading within the EU may as well be left in place because the tedious spade work is already done.

We already have trade deals with the rest of the world but that can only get better when some areas restricted by EU membership are removed. The massive financial benefits Mr Reed refers to such as support for our regions and farming are simply getting our own money back but with the difference that we decide who gets the support. Migrants essential to our economy will continue to be essential and no one is suggesting they are all sent home. Again, the difference there is we can decide who is essential and allowed to live and work here.

On his other various points touching on the benefits to education, science, medicine, etc arising from our links to Europe, he seems to imply all such contacts will be curtailed. No one is going to ban British delegates from cultural exchanges or projects of mutual benefit just because we are not a member of the EU.

As for his comments on visa free tourism travel, I think we can dismiss concerns about that at the level of thinking by some woman who said earlier she thought Brexit meant she wouldn’t be able to holiday in Spain any more! One cloud on the Brexit horizon is that membership of the EU has bred an expensive culture of bureaucracy and a bonanza for lawyers, politicians and civil servants. If our own are allowed to perpetuate that culture, then Mr Reed could be proved right on another point where he says there will be no winners.

From: Josephine Ford, Filey.

EVER since the decision to leave the EU, I have been puzzled and concerned at all the talk about “deals” with Brussels, and I was therefore encouraged to read the article by Paul Sykes (The Yorkshire Post, September 24).