YP Letters: Calling election was tactical move, but will it benefit nation?

Prime Minister Theresa May and her husband Philip walk into 10 Downing Street after seeing  Queen Elizabeth II where she asked to form a new government.
Prime Minister Theresa May and her husband Philip walk into 10 Downing Street after seeing Queen Elizabeth II where she asked to form a new government.
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From: Alan Chapman, Beck Lane, Bingley.

WHEN Theresa May called an unexpected General Election, I was stunned and immediately declared it was a gross error, no election should have been called until after the planned Parliamentary boundary equalisation changes were completed.

Labour’s Robin Cook was the architect who gerrymandered the Parliamentary boundaries under the instructions of Tony Blair and his massive majority, this gave Labour a six per cent built in advantage that still exist today. It will never be corrected until a Conservative overall majority government is in control of the Commons and implements the adjustment.

The PM’s advisory team clearly over confident, it was the fundamental responsibility of Conservative Central Office to eradicate the Labour Party’s unfair advantage.

The reason that Labour constituencies in the North East, Sunderland, Newcastle etc, are the first to declare their results, is they have smaller electorates and thus fewer votes to count, compared to Conservative Richmond in North Yorkshire that has over 80,000 electors.

In the tight result of this General Election one side having a six per cent advantage was crucial!

From: Chris Gallacher, Chairman, Ukip Redcar.

THANK you to all who decided to back Ukip. Remember no war is won by a single victory but by many setbacks being overcome and maintaining focus and the desire to win. We have many battles to win but in the end victory will come.

From: Jarvis Browning, Fadmoor.

I STILL feel very embittered and angry that this election had to be held now! I just hope that it will benefit our county!

From: Ralph Lennard, Leeds.

HOW can it be democratic that students who are only temporary residents in any consistency influence an election so 
much?

It’s now June and a lot of these students are finishing the course they have been doing for the last few years and will be going home soon.

Surely, they should be registered at their original home address and then have a postal vote?

In my view this has distorted the election result particularly in cities, such as Leeds, which have a large transient student population.