YP Letters: EU debate has become a shameful argument on layers of bureaucracy

Prime Minister David Cameron holds a Q&A session with staff at the Caterpillar factory in Peterborough while on the EU referendum campaign trail.
Prime Minister David Cameron holds a Q&A session with staff at the Caterpillar factory in Peterborough while on the EU referendum campaign trail.
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From: J W Buckley, Aketon, Pontefract.

ON reading the headline to Bernard Ingham’s column (The Yorkshire Post, April 20) ‘Holding my tongue to set out facts on state of the EU’, I thought he would do just that; ie hold his tongue and explain that there are no facts.

In the ‘debate’ on the EU, we have opinions, and facts quoted to back up those opinions.

What facts do we have? Surely, there must be some! First, after pulling up the drawbridge and telling everyone you can manage just fine on your own, it becomes lonely. If you keep your nerve, and your health; have a run of good luck, then you can show ‘em.

Fact one. While people might manage on their own, it is much easier, healthier and generally better, to work with others.

Fact two. You can achieve 
more as a group than as an individual.

Fact three. There are risks in life. Minor risks, we can run, but major risks we cannot. That is why there are insurance companies. Belonging to something like the EU, is like having insurance.

You grumble about the size of the premium, but you can only come up with very generalised reasons for doing so.

Fact four. When politicians justify things ‘in the national interest’, or start talking about sovereignty, watch them carefully.

Sir Bernard finished by saying that leaving would restore authority to the ‘Mother of Parliaments’. She may well be mother, but she is getting on a bit now, and her carers have been taking advantage.

Fact five. Politicians are all the same. Are ‘our’ politicians better than ‘their’ politicians? Do ‘our’ politicians have the answers whilst ‘theirs’ don’t?

Fact six. We may be an island, but no man is – and no state either – particularly these days.

Fact seven. Generally, we are respected as a nation. We could, and should, have vision, and wisdom. We could, and should, have confidence in ourselves. We could, and should, stand up for the basic values of life.

Instead, we send a gunboat here, or a fighter jet there, and pay out money in overseas aid, thinking it helps the needy. If it salves your conscience, it does not mine. People look up to us, and all we can do is squabble about the EU and argue about what’s in it for us.

Look about you. See what is wrong with the state of the states, and how many of them exploit and abuse their citizens.

Does it not make you feel ashamed that we are wasting effort on petty argument about how many layers of bureaucracy we should have?