YP Letters: No one has a crystal ball on National Insurance

It should be remembered that the elderly have paid National Insurance throughout their working lives.
It should be remembered that the elderly have paid National Insurance throughout their working lives.
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From: Terry Marston, Lincoln.

WHEN I started to play golf, after a time, I decided to join a club. That wasn’t cheap. There was a “joining fee” and an annual membership to be paid. The substantial joining fee was to qualify me to enjoy the facilities of the club that earlier members had put in place and supported over the years, with their money and commitment.

New, younger members were not denied access to these benefits.

Newer, younger members of the golf club were grateful for the facility that had been made available by their predecessors, and enjoyed it.

What a contrast with National Insurance where there is no joining fee and, from the outset of paying the basic qualifying contributions, new, younger members qualify for the benefits of the scheme. Generous.

However, they are encouraged to be discontented with this structure.

Pressure groups (usually the right-wing press et al) decry the fact that older ex-contributors are living long and may be about to benefit from the scheme out of all proportion to the others (though it was they who made the scheme what it is).

That this is a fact cannot be disputed. That it is inequitable is rubbish because the rest is yet to come and who is going to forecast the outcome?