YP Letters: Plague on the Houses who defy the people

Pro-EU membership supporters argue with a leave campaigner outside the High Court, on the second day of the lawsuit of Gina Miller, a founder of investment management group SCM Private in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2016. Rival protesters have gathered outside the High Court in London, where lawyers are battling over whether the government has the power to trigger Britain's exit from the European Union without approval from Parliament.

Pro-EU membership supporters argue with a leave campaigner outside the High Court, on the second day of the lawsuit of Gina Miller, a founder of investment management group SCM Private in London, Monday, Oct. 17, 2016. Rival protesters have gathered outside the High Court in London, where lawyers are battling over whether the government has the power to trigger Britain's exit from the European Union without approval from Parliament.

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Have your say

From: Hugh Rogers, Messingham Road, Ashby.

DEMANDS by MPs to be given the power to frustrate the will of the British people by delaying, watering-down or completely vetoing Brexit are, of course, fully in line with Parliament’s well-known track record of ignoring what the people who elected them want – the vote to abolish capital punishment is another prime example.

In my view, we should not simply reduce the numbers of MPs by tweaking constituency boundaries – we should abolish both Houses of Parliament altogether as unnecessary obstacles to the efficient government of the country.

“You have sat here too long for any good you have been doing,” said Oliver Cromwell in an earlier, more sensible age “In the name of God, go!” Couldn’t have put it any better myself.

From: Peter Staniforth, Glusburn, Yorkshire.

COULD Don Burslam please explain why the views of a few hundred should overrule the wishes of 17.4 million voters?

His second paragraph answers his own point (The Yorkshire Post, October 17).

We live in a democracy. The dictionary explains the meaning.

From: John Howe, Ascough Wynd, Bedale.

WHILE I have my own opinion of the result of the referendum, when will newscasters, reporters and correspondents begin using accurate grammar and realise that we voted to leave the European Union not ‘exit’? Exit is a noun, not a verb!

From: John Watson, Rowan Court, Leyburn.

WHY are we getting all worked up about our economy? I am no economist, but I always thought a little inflation was ideal.

Over the last 25 years, our inflation rate has hardly hit three per cent and we, as a nation have been okay.

A small rise in what we pay for goods is not going to hurt us. As for foreign holidays, which are often quoted, they are a voluntary item and not a necessity.

The problem, as I see it, is the interest rate. I know people who have worked their socks off trying to keep this country prosperous, but now have 
hardly a return on any savings invested.

As for the “Marmite” story, isn’t it odd that when there is a price rise it happens immediately, but any drop in price takes ages to come into effect.

In this case, the increase was blatant and unnecessary and a disgrace. The answer is don’t buy the product.

So, Mrs May, go for the “hard Brexit”. We don’t want to be tied to Europe in any shape or form.

Digital boost for health care

From: Ian Sharp, CEO, DHEZ Ltd, Bradford.

IN the NHS of the past patients visited hospitals to see doctors and clinicians in person – and their notes were sent around in a great big folder. Not in the future.

As Bryn Page remarks (The Yorkshire Post, October 10), digital innovation such as portable, wearable, wireless digital devices will have a massive impact on pathology and testing. But digital innovation can also help tackle one of the most challenging aspects of healthcare today – caring for our ageing population.

Konnektis, one of our recent local success stories here at the Digital Health Enterprise Zone (DHEZ), has developed a system that uses an internet-enabled tablet to track and monitor the care of the elderly in their homes.

This creates a single point of reference for all carers and service providers so that they can deliver more effective, more individual, up-to-date care. This reduces the need for confusing paper records.

DHEZ offered Konnektis collaborative work space, as well as helping them secure a three-month trial working with Bradford Council, and free EE sim-cards.

Konnektis is just one of many digital solutions that will benefit from DHEZ in Little Germany in Bradford – who are looking for more local digital innovators to help make the NHS more efficient and cut out those wasteful journeys and pointless paperwork. So do get in touch!

Sharing expertise

From: Steve Oversby, Director, Barnardo’s East Region.

IF we are serious about transforming the life chances of the most vulnerable children, we need to change the way we deliver children’s services.

We think that in the years ahead there won’t be enough resources to meet demand, so we need a systemic rethink. Although local authorities will always have the ultimate responsibility, the voluntary sector has a vital role to play too.

But at present, scarce resources can be used looking for short-term fixes and sticking- plaster solutions. Instead we want to urge national and local government to work with voluntary sector organisations like Barnardo’s in strategic partnerships to achieve long- lasting change.

We want to be working with local authorities as partners – to be around the table when the problems are identified and help finding the best solutions together. We want to be able to share our insight, our experience and our understanding of local communities.

Most of all, in our 150th year we want to play our part in shaping services, so that children and young people know we believe in them and will support them.

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