A tropical island, 11.8bn chocolate bars and 363 more teachers... all for the price of £7.1bn Westminster refurbishment

A workman outside the Houses of Parliament in London, as a report suggests that the taxpayer faces a bill of up to �7.1 billion to stop the Palace of Westminster falling down unless MPs and peers agree to move out. (Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)
A workman outside the Houses of Parliament in London, as a report suggests that the taxpayer faces a bill of up to �7.1 billion to stop the Palace of Westminster falling down unless MPs and peers agree to move out. (Picture: Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)
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What could you do with the £7.1 billion taxpayers face spending to stop the Palace of Westminster falling down?

• You could build five more Shards in London, and still have £1.1bn to spare.

• With Virgin Galactic tickets into space selling for £157,000 (250,000 US dollars), you could send 45,159 people up to look at the cosmos.

• The tropical island of Saddle Back Cays, in the Bahamas, is on the market for £8.17 million, meaning you could buy it 869 times.

• 5,017 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesses - the world’s most luxurious supercars.

• 11.8bn dairy milk bars - enough for 184 chocolate bars for every person living in the UK.

The study and associated investigations to discover how much it will cost to fix the Palace of Westminster cost £8 million. What else could it get you?

• 353 trainee doctors

• 363 trainee teachers

• 343 police officers

• 296 undergraduates could have their three years of university tuition fees paid for.

• 3,952 all-zones one-year London travel cards.

• 55,172 yearly-licence fees.

Fixing Westminster to cost £7bn

There are five scenarios proposed for the renovation of the Palace of Westminster. Here are the key figures for each:

Scenario E1A

This is the longest scheme and the only one that would allow both MPs and peers to remain on site for the duration of the work.

• Likely duration: 32 years

• Estimated capital cost: £5.7bn

• Estimated whole life cost: £7.9bn

• Construction work begins: after 2020 general election

• Construction work estimated to end: 2051

• Number of general elections affected: six

• Estimated maximum duration: 40 years

• Work completed sequentially in 13 zones around the site

Scenario 2A

This is the first of two schemes that would require a partial relocation of the business of parliament.

• Likely duration: 11 years

• Estimated capital cost: £3.9bn

• Estimated whole life cost: £8.4bn

• Construction work begins: after 2020 general election

• Construction work estimated to end: 2031

• Number of general elections affected: two

• Estimated maximum duration: 14 years

• Work completed in two phases, with one Chamber at a time moving into temporary accommodation

Scenario 2B

This is the second of two schemes to require a partial relocation of the business of parliament. But unlike Scenario 2A, this would leave the Palace of Westminster with enhanced amenities and improved functionality.

• Likely duration 11 years

• Estimated capital cost: £4.4bn

• Estimated whole life cost: £9.1bn

• Construction work begins: after 2020 general election

• Construction work estimated to end: 2031

• Number of general elections affected: two

• Estimated maximum duration: 14 years

• Work completed in two phases, with one Chamber at a time moving into temporary accommodation

Scenario 3B

This is the first of two schemes that would involve the entire relocation of both the Commons and the Lords, along with all other parliamentary staff and employees.

• Likely duration: six years

• Estimated capital cost: £3.5bn

• Estimated whole life cost: £8.3bn

• Construction work begins: after 2020 general election

• Construction work estimated to end: 2026

• Number of general elections affected: one

• Estimated maximum duration: eight years

• Work completed in one phase across entire Palace of Westminster

Scenario 3C

This scheme also involves the complete relocation of the business of parliament, and is slightly more expensive than Scenario 3B due to additional amenities such as covered courtyards, improved air conditioning and informal meeting areas.

• Likely duration: six years

• Estimated capital cost: £3.9bn

• Estimated whole life cost: £9.1bn

• Construction work begins: after 2020 general election

• Construction work estimated to end: 2026

• Number of general elections affected: one

• Estimated maximum duration: eight years

• Work completed in one phase across entire Palace of Westminster