Roman goddess Diana returns to her home on top of old mill in a new form

Workmen replacing the statue of goddess Diana the huntress on the roof of the 18th Century Howsham Mill on the River Derwent, near Stamford Bridge.
Workmen replacing the statue of goddess Diana the huntress on the roof of the 18th Century Howsham Mill on the River Derwent, near Stamford Bridge.
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A RESTORATION project which has spanned almost a decade has reached a landmark with a statue of a Roman goddess returned to the roof of an 18th century mill.

The Renewable Heritage Trust, which is overseeing the extensive renovations of Howsham Mill, returned the statue of Diana the Huntress to the historic building’s roof yesterday.

But in a 21st century twist, the new statue is made of lightweight wire mesh, rather than the original lead. Surrey-based wire mesh sculptor Nikki Taylor was commissioned to create a new Diana for the roof of the mill, which stands on an island on the River Derwent near Howsham in North Yorkshire. Her previous commissions include five life-sized mesh sculptures of athletes for the Olympic village for last summer’s Games in London.

The new sculpture has been funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and public donations. The original Diana was a 4ft-high lead statue, but had been removed for scrap with only a foot and an arm remaining when the Renewables Heritage Trust began the restoration in 2004. Once the work is completed, the mill will be used for environmental studies to promote renewable energy as well as a community venue.

A waterwheel has been re-instated to generate electricity.

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