Video: Time runs out for Yorkshire’s Cold War bomber

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TIME is running out if you want to witness the spectacular sight and sound of a Vulcan bomber in flight.

XH558 is the only airworthy Avro Vulcan in the world but by the end of this year’s flying season it will be grounded for safety reasons.

Pilot Bill Ramsey. Picture:  Ross Parry Agency

Pilot Bill Ramsey. Picture: Ross Parry Agency

Her final flight is likely to be in the autumn.

A spokesman for the Vulcan to the Sky Trust, which has raised millions to keep the Vulcan flying since buying the aircraft in 2005, said it would be a special summer but also an emotional one.

“After she has landed from her last flight this autumn, there will no longer by a flying Vulcan.

“We are going to work especially hard to make summer 2015 a memorable flying season for every Vulcan enthusiast across the country.

The Vulcan Bomber sets off from Robin Hood Airport, Doncaster. Picture by Simon Hulme

The Vulcan Bomber sets off from Robin Hood Airport, Doncaster. Picture by Simon Hulme

“We intend to use every flying hour available, taking her to more people than ever before.”

Organisers have 20 locations booked for the Vulcan this year, but none in Yorkshire.

There will be displays at RAF Cosford in June and at RAF Fairford in July.

On August 15 there will be a flypast at Herne Bay in Kent and a display in Bournemouth on August 23.

The Vulcan XH558, also known as the Vulcan Bomber and last flying example begins her final flying season. Picture: Ross Parry Agency

The Vulcan XH558, also known as the Vulcan Bomber and last flying example begins her final flying season. Picture: Ross Parry Agency

After the final flight, XH558 will still be a visitor attraction, although she won’t take off.

A Trust spokesman said the decision to cease flying was made after three expert companies on which it relied had decided to end their support at the end of this flying season.

Without their support, the Vulcan cannot fly because of aviation regulations.

The Trust spokesman said the Vulcan’s structure and systems were already more than 10 per cent beyond the flying hours of any other Vulcan, which means that it was becoming harder to know where to look for any possible problems.

The Vulcan Bomber sets off from Robin Hood Airport, Doncaster. Picture by Simon Hulme

The Vulcan Bomber sets off from Robin Hood Airport, Doncaster. Picture by Simon Hulme

Yesterday, enthusiasts gathered at Doncaster’s Robin Hood Airport as mark the launch of the Vulcan’s final flying season.

Details of appearances at www.vulcantothesky.org