Video: Toast rack that helps tell Sheffield’s story

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Sheffield’s Weston Park Museum has launched a new exhibition telling the story of the city through 100 artefacts chosen by residents. Our City, Our Objects includes a toast rack made in 1880 by major manufacturer James Dixon and Sons.

Among the other artefacts on view...

Sheffield's Curatorial Services Manager Sian Brown with a goblet by Brian Asquith which has been chosen to make up part of the  Our City, Our Objects exhibition

Sheffield's Curatorial Services Manager Sian Brown with a goblet by Brian Asquith which has been chosen to make up part of the Our City, Our Objects exhibition

• A 1900s bottle of Henderson’s Relish, the Sheffield culinary institution established in 1885

• A handmade Bowie Knife produced in Sheffield in 2007 by Reg Cooper, who has worked in the city’s cutlery industry since 1945.

• An embroidery sampler made in 1840 by Sheffield’s Elizabeth Dungworth, aged 11, a victim of the Victorian city’s high child mortality rates

• 17th century clay pipes found during excavations carried out at the site of Sheffield Castle during the 1920s

• A silver goblet created in 1980 by Sheffield-born silversmith Brian Asquith, designer of the iconic bronze fountains in the city’s Peace Gardens.

• The painting, View of Science Gallery at Weston Park Museum, by Beatrice Adams, a student at the Sheffield School of Art, whose alumni included Stanley Royle and Godfrey Sykes.

• Ivory-handled razors dating from around 1880 manufactured by Thomas R Cadman and Sons Ltd, a Sheffield company with trade links to India at the height of the British Empire.

• Paul Waplington’s painting, Wybourn Estate, an evocative depiction of one of the city’s suburbs in the 1980s.

• A Christopher Dresser-designed toast rack made in 1880 by Sheffield’s James Dixon & Sons, one of the major British manufacturers of the Industrial Revolution.

• A Medieval floor tile from Beauchief Abbey, which was founded in 1176 by Robert FitzRabulf