Views sought on making village a conservation area

People are being asked for their views on plans to make Bramhope in Leeds a conservation area in a move to protect the village.

If backed, the proposals will for the first time help to protect the village's unique architecture and historical attractions from inappropriate demolition and development.

Under the plans a new conservation area will take in large areas of the village, including the historic medieval village core around The Cross, The Creskelds and other areas of 1930s developments and historic farm complexes such as Staircase House.

Bramhope dates from at least 1086 in the Domesday Book but there is prehistoric evidence in the area, so it is believed there has been human activity there for around 4,000 years

Coun Richard Lewis, Leeds City Council's executive member responsible for city development, said: "Bramhope is a village of historic importance and has maintained its unique character as the social mix has changed and new residents have moved in.

"Creating a conservation area will help safeguard the special architecture of the village and protect important buildings from demolition.

"Awarding an area conservation status is an important step and the opinions of local people are an valued part of this process. We welcome people's views on the proposals."

The draft proposals for Bramhope's conservation area are available on-line throughout the consultation at www.leeds.gov.uk/conservation. Copies will also be held at The Robert Cravan Memorial Hall for public viewing.

The public consultation runs until Friday, February 25. A public meeting and drop-in session will be held on Tuesday, February 1, at The Robert Cravan Memorial Hall from 7pm. The proposals will be taken to council officials for approval in March 2011.

People can respond to this consultation during the public meeting, or by emailing the conservation team at building.conservation@leeds.gov.uk.

Buildings within a conservation area are protected from unauthorised demolition, and new developments have to meet higher standards of design than elsewhere. Other planning rules are slightly different and permission from the council is needed for certain activities such as tree felling.