Viking mound in forest was something to shout about

Vikings would have found the mound in Sherwood Forest was perfect for making an announcement due to its acoustic qualities.
Vikings would have found the mound in Sherwood Forest was perfect for making an announcement due to its acoustic qualities.
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VIKINGS could have built a mound in Sherwood Forest as a place where they could make themselves heard, according to the latest studies by academics.

Four years ago, the Forestry Commission revealed that a rare Viking meeting place – or a Thing – had been found in the forest in north Nottinghamshire.

Since then efforts have stepped up to unravel the past of the area, known as Thynghowe, and earlier this year archaeologists probed the site with the aid of hi-tech equipment.

Experts from University College London and local group, the Friends of Thynghowe, have now discovered that the mound was a perfect place to make an announcement.

They tested the site’s acoustic qualities by reciting passages in Anglo Saxon from the top of the mound, with researchers testing how well it could be heard in the surrounding area.

Lynda Mallet, who together with husband Stuart Reddish and John Wood, rediscovered Thynghowe, said: “The words could be heard over a very wide area, proving that the site was ideal as an assembly point where issues were resolved and disputes heard.

“Thynghowe is unique as few such sites have much or any recorded history, but ours has been cited in documents from the 1200s to 1816. Experts in Scandinavia are very excited by the find.”

Andrew Norman, from the Forestry Commission, added: “This amazing place has only re-emerged because of the hard work of local volunteers. It could be even more important than we first thought – as it marked the boundary between Anglo Saxon Mercia and Northumberland.”