Watchdog raids second firm in region over horsemeat scandal

Whitbread, which owns Premier Inn, Beefeater Grill and Brewers Fayre, admitted horse DNA had been found in its food.
Whitbread, which owns Premier Inn, Beefeater Grill and Brewers Fayre, admitted horse DNA had been found in its food.
0
Have your say

COMPUTERS and paperwork have been taken away from Hull firm Flexi Foods by the Food Standards Agency investigating how horsemeat found its way into beef products.

The business is the second in the region to be raided as part of the horsemeat scandal after the Peter Boddy Slaughterhouse in Todmorden was targeted on Tuesday.

Owner Peter Boddy 
remained in custody last night on suspicion of fraud.

Flexi Foods has previously been linked to the importation of beef from Poland suspected of contamination with horsemeat that was sold to Irish firm McAdam Foods.

Amid growing concern over how widespread the contamination might be, Sheffield City Council moved to ban the use of processed meat in school meals.

A joint statement between the council and its school meals provider, Taylor Shaw, said: “Although we have been given assurances by our suppliers about the provenance of the pre-prepared food, we take the safety of the young people in our schools very seriously.

“In light of the ongoing revelations of illegal activity by unscrupulous people regarding the contamination of processed meat products this week, as a precaution we have taken the joint decision to suspend the use of all processed meat products in all school meals with immediate effect.

“We hope this will reassure parents and carers who may have any reservations about their children’s school meals.”

The FSA, which also raided two premises in London on Thursday, yesterday published the latest results from its tests into beef products since the start of the scandal. They showed seven products already withdrawn from sale had tested positive for containing at least one per cent horsemeat.