Waterfront landmark set for fresh role

The Bonding Warehouse alongside the River Ouse in the centre of York

The Bonding Warehouse alongside the River Ouse in the centre of York

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A LANDMARK 19th century warehouse in York which has remained derelict for more than a decade is set to be transformed into a riverside restaurant and offices as part of a multi-million pound development.

Councillors are being urged to give the green light to the plans for the Bonding Warehouse on the banks of the River Ouse in the centre of York when they meet next week.

The Grade II listed building dates from 1875 and is one of the few surviving warehouses on the river’s west bank, although it has fallen into disrepair since it was flooded in the deluge of 2000.

Next week members of York Council’s area planning committee will consider an application 
to turn the Bonding Warehouse, in Terry Avenue, York, into a restaurant, offices and four apartments.

Coun Sonja Crisp, York Council’s cabinet member for leisure, culture and tourism, said yesterday: “I am just pleased to see that things are moving forward with the building and hopefully it will come back into use.

“It’s an individual application and it will be up to the planning committee to decide on it. However, it would be really good news for us once that building gets back into use because it is a landmark building.”

Peter Callaghan is seeking both full planning permission to carry out the alterations and listed building consent. Council officers are proposing councillors give both the go-ahead when they meet on Thursday, subject to conditions.

A report to be considered by councillors says: “The building has been empty since 2000.

“In spite of the implementation of a ‘tanking’ scheme inside the ground floor of the building to minimize the impact of flooding, the building is deteriorating and is highlighted as being ‘at risk’ in the Central Historic Core conservation appraisal.”

Permission is sought for use of the northern part of the ground floor of the building as offices and for the southern part of the ground floor to be used as either offices or a restaurant. The first floor would also be used as offices.

Is also proposed the development would include four apartments.

English Heritage say it welcomes in principle the conversion of the redundant building into a new use. While the Conservation Areas Advisory Panel raise some concerns including fears that balconies proposed on the Skeldergate elevation are out of character, it says it hopes issues can be resolved and the building can be successfully restored.

Five objections have been received by the local authority, including a petition from people concerned about the noise it will generate and fears that it is a commercial development within a residential area and will increase traffic.

Three letters of support have been received, welcoming a restaurant, providing it is not a bar/entertainment venue, saying it would add to the riverside’s appeal.

Officers are recommending that both applications are given the thumbs up.

A report to be considered by members says: “The building is an important component of the riverside environment and this scheme would appear to create a new viable use for the building.

“It would remove dereliction and provide new life in this 
area.”

The building was a bar until the licence expired in 2000 and its future had been uncertain after several redevelopment proposals failed.

A property developer had previously hoped to convert the warehouse into York’s first five-star hotel, but missed the chance when the building was sold to another bidder.

Permission has previously been granted by councillors to turn the building into a mix of offices and apartments.

joanne.ginley@ypn.co.uk

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