Wife’s toy-boy lover jailed over killing of Yorkshire golf pro Andrew Jackson

Cohnor Coleman
Cohnor Coleman
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A TOY-BOY who killed his lover’s husband by beating him to death in the street has been jailed for more than six years.

Cohnor Coleman, 24, repeatedly punched former golf pro Andrew Jackson, 43, following a night out in Richmond, North Yorkshire.

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson

The jury at Teesside Crown Court cleared Coleman of murder but convicted him of manslaughter. Coleman had previously admitted the manslaughter of Mr Jackson but pleaded not guilty to murder.

The detective leading the investigation into the attack said he “flew into a jealous rage...and violently took out his frustration on Andrew for no justifiable reason”.

Coleman, of Cookson Way, Brough with St Giles, near Catterick, attacked Mr Jackson because he was “frustrated and angry” after seeing 38-year-old Sarah Jackson with another man in a bar.

He had started a sexual relationship with Mrs Jackson around three weeks before the killing and said he believed they had a future together.

“Cohnor Coleman flew into a jealous rage that night and violently took out his frustration on Andrew for no justifiable reason.”

Allan Harder, North Yorkshire Police

All three were drinking in the Cavern bar in Richmond town centre on the night of the attack in April.

The Recorder of Middlesbrough, Judge Simon Bourne-Arton, jailed Coleman for six years and nine months today.

Judge Bourne-Arton said Mr Jackson was rendered unconscious by Coleman’s first punch but said the killer delivered four or five more “heavy blows” while his victim was on the ground.

He said: “You repeatedly punched Andrew Jackson while he was on the floor unconscious. This was an unprovoked attack on a defenceless individual.”

Richmond's Cavern Bar, scene of the attack. Picture: Google Maps

Richmond's Cavern Bar, scene of the attack. Picture: Google Maps

The judge described Coleman as “a thoroughly selfish, immature individual” with an “inflated view of your own importance”.

The five-day trial heard that Coleman had a secret crush on Mrs Jackson when he was younger.

He said they had discussed moving in together but Judge Bourne-Arton rejected these claims.

He said Coleman realised on the evening of the attack that his relationship with Mrs Jackson was ending and he could not accept that.

He was asked to leave the bar after seeing the mother of two getting close with another man. Mrs Jackson followed him out and, moments later, Mr Jackson also left the bar.

Coleman then launched his attack on Mr Jackson, who died two days later in hospital having suffered a bleed to the brain.

Judge Bourne-Arton said: “On the 25 April, you took out your frustrations and your anger on Mr Jackson.”

He added: “You were not, as you claim, calm when you attacked him. You were frustrated and angry.”

The judge said Mrs Jackson was not to blame for what happened to her husband.

He told Coleman: “What happened on 25 April was entirely your actions.”

Mr Jackson’s father Andrew said in a statement: “The last five months have been horrendous, but I would like to thank everyone at North Yorkshire Police and the teams involved in this case.

“I would also like to thank the prosecution team led by Mr Paul Mitchell for all their hard work. Thank you to all our family and friends who have supported Sue and I during this ordeal.

“My son Andrew will always be in my heart and will always be missed.”

Detective Chief Inspector Allan Harder of North Yorkshire Police, who led the investigation, said: “Andrew Jackson suffered an untimely and tragic death which has caused untold suffering and heartache for his family and friends.

“Cohnor Coleman flew into a jealous rage that night and violently took out his frustration on Andrew for no justifiable reason. It was an unprovoked, brutal and unnecessary attack. Tragically, Andrew found himself in the wrong place at the wrong time.

“Andrew’s loved-ones will gain little comfort from the outcome at court. Nothing will bring him back to them. I just hope they can now begin the long process of coming to terms with their loss and proudly keep Andrew’s memory alive.”