Without legal aid, we wouldn’t have been able to fight to help our son

Andrew Green with his parents, Rick and Julie, and sister, Joanna, 11, at their home near Grimsby. Andrew has cerebral palsy after a brain injury during his birth. The family pursued a medical negligence case using legal aid and were awarded a seven-figure sum.  Picture: Terry Carrott

Andrew Green with his parents, Rick and Julie, and sister, Joanna, 11, at their home near Grimsby. Andrew has cerebral palsy after a brain injury during his birth. The family pursued a medical negligence case using legal aid and were awarded a seven-figure sum. Picture: Terry Carrott

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Proposed cuts in legal aid may mean that many people will not be able to sue the NHS for medical negligence in future. Sheena Hastings reports.

IN April 1997, Julie Green and her husband Rick set off for Grimsby Maternity Hospital to have the birth of their first child induced. Julie had had a normal pregnancy, but the baby was now 11 days overdue. She was given the tablets, hours later nothing had happened and more drugs were needed to trigger labour. A couple of days into the process the baby was showing signs of distress, and the midwife said she thought a caesarian section would be needed to deliver him safely.

Many hours later and with little further progress, Julie says “the midwife put her foot down”. There was then some delay between the decision to go ahead with the delivery and the operation actually happening. When Andrew was born with the umbilical cord wrapped twice around his neck and having ingested his own faeces, he was in a very poorly condition and needed immediate specialist care.

 

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