YouTuber, Lengthsman and other things you can now call yourself on your insurance form

Fans pose for pictures with waxwork figures of vloggers Zoe Sugg and Alfie Deyes (also known as Zoella and PointlessBlog) sitting in an exact replica of the spare bedroom they often vlog from, in a new YouTube-themed exhibit at Madame Tussauds in London.

Fans pose for pictures with waxwork figures of vloggers Zoe Sugg and Alfie Deyes (also known as Zoella and PointlessBlog) sitting in an exact replica of the spare bedroom they often vlog from, in a new YouTube-themed exhibit at Madame Tussauds in London.

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BLOGGING, Tweeting and uploading videos to YouTube may seem like trivial pursuits - but you can now claim them as occupations when you apply for insurance.

The Association of British Insurers says it will accept Blogger, Vlogger, Tweeter and YouTuber as valid full-time jobs - along with ancient and arcane occupations such as agisters, almoners and ostlers.

Gerry Bucke, general manager of specialist broker Adrian Flux, which claims several “high-profile YouTubers” as clients, said thousands of motorists could be paying “inaccurate premiums” because insurers don’t know how to classify their jobs.

He said: “When was the last time you bumped into an agister or an ostler?

“The rapid recent growth of careers in digital media has clearly caught the ABI out and the list is very much in need of an update.”

There are only five known agisters in the UK - they help with the management of commoners’ livestock in the New Forest - but Mr Bucke said there were “tens of thousands of social media managers, email marketers and search engine optimisation consultants remain invisible to insurers”.

Other occupations added to Flux’s lists include email marketer, professional gamer, drone operator and app developer.

Last year Madame Tussauds in London created waxworks of two “vloggers” known as Zoella and PointlessBlog, who broadcast via YouTube from their spare bedroom.

Weird jobs acceptable for insurance purposes

Almoner: People who were in charge of an almshouse, which were established from the 10th century to provide a place of residence for poor, old and distressed people. Can also refer to the giver of charity to the poor or hospital workers who help patients with personal matters.

Cardinal: There is one Cardinal in the UK, His Eminence Vincent Nichols, Archbishop of Westminster.

Carphone fitter: Cutting edge, in the late 80s and early 90s.

Caulker: Filled up cracks in ships, casks, windows or seams to make them watertight by using tar or oakum hemp fibre produced by taking old ropes apart.

Compositor: Also called typesetters, long since replaced in most circumstances by digital printing.

Lengthsman: A person who took pride in keeping his district neat and tidy in rural areas, or who carried out routine maintenance on canals, patrolling its length.

Ostler: A man employed to look after the horses of people staying at an inn.

Water diviner: Also known as a dowser, still exist in fairly small numbers, helping organisations find underground water (and minerals, ley lines, or indeed anything invisible).

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