Backlash over Boycott sacking: The week that was October 24 to 30, 1983.

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During this week in 1983, Yorkshire County Cricket Club was facing a special general meeting over the sacking of Geoff Boycott following months of friction. Boycott supporters in the Yorkshire Members 1984 Group, furious that he had been “run out of the club” before his testimonial season the following year, had gathered more than enough signatures to force the meeting.

Boycott supporters in the Yorkshire Members 1984 Group, furious that he had been “run out of the club” before his testimonial season the following year, had gathered more than enough signatures to force the meeting.

The club was now obliged to name a date within 21 days when the meeting would be held to hear the grievances of those who had called for it.

Among the resolutions to be tabled was one which stated that members had no confidence in the club’s committees – which had decided not to renew the former captain’s contract three weeks previously. The batsman had said that if he was allowed to play one more season he could leave Headingley “on a high note”.

Seven children’s homes in Leeds faced possible closure as social workers in the city intensified their industrial action for more pay and shorter hours during this week of 1983.

The ‘family homes’ housed up to nine children each and were staffed by up to three social workers. One home – Waterloo Manor in Garforth – had already been forced to close, with its young residents moving into other homes or returning to their families.

A spokesman for the National and Local Government Officers’ Union said: “While their lives will be temporarily disrupted, they (the children) will not be put at risk.”

More than 40 residential social workers in Leeds had joined the strike so far, and others were also expected to refuse to work weekends at homes for disabled children and the elderly. Social workers across the country had been taking action for six weeks in an attempt to win pay parity with other local government workers.

The Labour Party’s new leader Neil Kinnock was set to announce his Shadow Cabinet within days. The results of an election among Labour MPs to appoint a 15-member parliamentary committee from which major Cabinet appointments would be selected made it clear that Mr Kinnock would have to work with a cabinet that was from the right or moderate wings of the party.

Among six newcomers were John Prescott (Hull East), Michael Meacher, Robin Cook, John Cunningham, Barry Jones and Giles Radice. Denis Healey (Leeds East) was expected to retain his portfolio as Shadow Foreign Secretary.

Britain’s car manufacturers said they faced a Christmas crisis with a package of proposed EEC price and trade controls. The measures were calculated to give car buyers better choice by allowing more traders to sell new cars and also by removing price differentials for the same model across Europe.

In foreign news, The Yorkshire Post reported that suicide commandos driving explosive-packed trucks blasted two bases of sleeping US and French troops in Beirut, killing at least 150 and reducing buildings to smoking heaps of rubble.

The Pentagon said at least 146 US servicemen were dead following the attack on an American marine base near Beirut Airport.

President Reagan expressed sorrow and outrage, but added that such events would not deter him from trying to achieve national reconciliation in Lebanon. US Defence Secretary Caspar Weinberger said there was
evidence that Iran was behind the attack.

In the wake of the atrocity, Neil Kinnock called for the removal of the 97-strong British peacekeeping force in Lebanon, but the Government said no hasty decisions would be made.