Remembering sacrifice of past generations

Derek Webb, who was a bugler in the Royal Green Jackets, plays the Last Post for his Great Uncle Albert Webb, who has his name engraved among the 11953 Commonwealth soldiers at Tyne Cot cemetery near Ypres, Belgium.

Derek Webb, who was a bugler in the Royal Green Jackets, plays the Last Post for his Great Uncle Albert Webb, who has his name engraved among the 11953 Commonwealth soldiers at Tyne Cot cemetery near Ypres, Belgium.

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The Yorkshire Post’s plans for its First World War centenary coverage has attracted widespread support.

Sir Alan Langlands, vice-chancellor of the University of Leeds, said: “We are delighted to partner with the Yorkshire Post as it launches its own efforts to pay tribute to those affected by the First World War.

“Our Legacies of War project has looked at the profound effects those four years had on people’s lives and the fundamental changes they unleashed in almost every aspect of society – from art and culture through to science, technology and medicine.

“Academics from a varied range of disciplines have worked closely with partners across Leeds and throughout Yorkshire, ensuring a genuinely two-way flow of knowledge and experience between our staff, students and members of the public.”

Councillor Keith Wakefield, leader of Leeds City Council, said: “This year we begin the commemoration of the centenary of the First World War. It will be a time for reflection on war and peace, and an opportunity for us to pay our own tributes to the people in this city and beyond, who served their country in the armed forces and on the home front.

“As part of the commemoration, a programme of events and activities focusing on the story of the war and its impact will be held across Yorkshire, delivered by a wide range of groups and organisations.

“The First World War left an indelible mark on the fabric of our city, region and country, and this series of features by the Yorkshire Post promise to offer a personal and informative insight into the events which occurred on the home front and abroad.”

Pat Hunter, headteacher of Rossett School, Harrogate, said: “There are no survivors left to tell the story. It is important to study it as understanding what happened in the past helps us also understand the present and plan for the future.

“The effect on society was enormous at the time and it is useful to show younger generations the high price that was paid for our current lifestyles.”

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