Cockroft strikes gold as Britain top the table

Hannah Cockroft won the T34 100m world title for a third successive time (Picture: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire).

Hannah Cockroft won the T34 100m world title for a third successive time (Picture: Anthony Devlin/PA Wire).

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Halifax’s wheelchair racer Hannah Cockroft won gold in the T34 100m final at the International Paralympic Committee World Championships in Doha in record-breaking time.

Cockroft, 23, won her fifth World Championship gold medal with a new competition record time of 17.73secs. This means she has won the T34 100m crown at three consecutive Worlds.

Her attention now turns to the 400m final tomorrow night and the 800m competition next Wednesday.

There had been question marks over the double Paralympic gold medallist’s form after her seven-year, 300-race unbeaten streak was ended by 14-year-old compatriot Kare Adenegan over 400m at a recent meet.

Despite breaking the World Championship record, her personal best across 100m still stands at a world record mark of 17.60, a time set at the Swiss National Championships in Nottwil in May 2012.

Cockroft’s team-mates Sophie Hahn and Kadeena Cox set new world records in Doha. The British team topped the medal charts on a celebratory opening day, with four golds, a silver and two bronzes.

Hahn clocked a superb 12.60 to set a new T38 100m mark, defending the title she won in Lyon two years ago, while Cox raced to T37 gold over the same distance.

She ran 13.60 in the final, having already broken the world record by going a hundredth of a second quicker in her morning heat.

Eighteen-year-old Hahn was delighted by her record but already has designs on lowering the bar in future. “I was feeling fast but I’m over the moon to actually do it in the race. It’s amazing,” she said.

“I think I can maybe take that world record down to 12.30-12.40 but I’ll have to see.”

The first gold of the day went to Aled Davies in the shot put, courtesy of his own championship record 14.95m throw.

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