Countryside’s Trans Pennine Trail recognised at awards ceremony

A farm on the way to Trans Pennine Trail from Green Moor.
A farm on the way to Trans Pennine Trail from Green Moor.
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The Trans Pennine Trail has been a favourite location for riders in Yorkshire and beyond - and its associates are now celebrating recognition at the national British Horse Society annual awards.

The route, which was designed with equestrians in mind, was commended during a ceremony at Saddlers’ Hall in London. The awards are designed to recognise significant contributions to the equestrian community.

Trevor Halstead riding along the Trans Pennine Trail near Conisborough Viaduct.

Trevor Halstead riding along the Trans Pennine Trail near Conisborough Viaduct.

The Trail runs from coast to coast, along the north of England, with two-thirds being available to horse riders. Mandy Loach, from the TPT national office, has been instrumental in the success and was invited to receive the Access Award on behalf of the trail. She said: “Locally and nationally, we have had a fantastic amount of support, so we are very grateful.”

There are sections which are several miles long, which are available to horse riders. The trail runs through a variety of landscapes, urban and rural.

Mandy Loach is working to progress a section of canal towpath, in association with the Canal and River Trust, to allow horse riders to use part of the towpath of the Braithwaite and Sykehouse section of the New Junction Canal.

The Trail from coast-to-coast between Southport and Hornsea is 215 miles long. A north-south route connecting Leeds and Chesterfield, a spur to York and a spur to Kirkburton, means there are approximately 370 miles available to explore. It is mapped and signed all the way, mainly traffic free, and is surprisingly level.

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