Charity looks to help young into creative and digital industries

Young people eyeing a career in the creative and digital industries are being offered a helping hand once again by a leading charity.

The Printing Charity at its Print Futures Awards ceremony at the House of Lords in 2015

The Printing Charity says it is keen to attract as many applications for its Print Futures Awards, which are designed to help deal with the skills shortage in the industry.

Dr Mark Johnson, Print Futures Awards secretary, said the charity was keen to attract as many applications as possible and that it was already promoting the awards through universities in Yorkshire.

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Dr Johnson added: “Skilled staff are vital for business and the industry’s future, but funding training can be a challenge.

“We also want to hear from young people already working in printing, publishing, packaging or graphic arts, who would like to undertake training to benefit their career.”

The charity is also calling on businesses from the region to encourage young people who are eligible to apply for the awards.

Last year a record number of bursaries were handed out by The Printing Charity at its Print Futures Awards ceremony at the House of Lords.

Designed to give young people a start in the creative and digital industries, the awards saw 80 applicants last year and a record number of 37 were chosen for the award.

At the 2015 ceremony, John Wright, chairman of the Printing Charity, said: “It’s incredible how the Print Futures Awards have grown over the recent years.

“In 2012 there were eight winners, in 2013 there were 17 winners, in 2014 there were 24 and this year a record of 37 winners.”

In total, eight students out of the 37 were from Yorkshire universities.

Print Futures help fund any costs associated with relevant training courses for a career in printing, publishing or graphic arts, and anyone between the ages of 16 and 30 can apply.

Previous awards secretary, Terry Ulrick and, the then chief executive of the British Printing Industries Federation (BPIF), Michael Johnson founded the BPIF Educational Scholarships in 2003, which were then renamed Print Futures Awards in 2009.

Mr Ulrick stepped down last year handing over the reins to Dr Johnson.

This year’s awards will see a new sponsor come on board, with the Journalists’ Charity joining the British Printing Industries Federation (BPIF), SAXOPRINT, St Bride Foundation, John Crosfield Foundation, Unite the Union GPM & IT Sector, and The Book Trade Charity.

David Ilott, the Journalists’ Charity’s director, said: “This is an initiative that fits with our work representing journalists.

“The awards have helped young journalists to train, including a number currently studying for their MA in journalism.”

Dr Johnson said: “We are pleased to welcome the Journalists’ Charity on board as a sponsor of these annual awards, which are cash grants of up to £1,500 each to help pay for costs associated with relevant training courses for a career in printing, publishing, packaging or graphic arts.”

Lord Guy Black, executive director of the Telegraph Media Group, said: “The media industry in general is very lucky with the charities that surround it. The Printing Charity but also the work of the Journalists’ Charity, they all do such good work.”

The closing date for entries is May 27.

Application forms can be downloaded from www.printfuturesawards.com and entries should be emailed to [email protected]

Shortlisted applicants will be interviewed on June 13 and 14. The awards will be presented on July 19 at a special event in London.

Getting a helping hand

Last year Emily Hoyland, a student at Leeds Beckett University studying for a BA in Journalism, was one of the students who was awarded a Print Futures grant. She used the money to help fund summer internships.

Kemi Alemoru, a student at Sheffield University, was also a winner.

She said the money would go towards funding her masters degree.