Drivers could be fined £100 for playing music too loudly

Drivers could be fined £100 for playing music too loudly
Drivers could be fined £100 for playing music too loudly

Motorists are to be fined for playing their music too loudly while driving, as part of a clampdown on anti-social behaviour.

An English council has announced plans to trial a scheme that means drivers can be fined £100 for a range of car-related anti-social behaviour, including cranking up the music.

Bradford Council has introduced a new Public Space Protection Order (PSPO) which allows police and council officers to take action against driver for a number of nuisance behaviours.

Sexual suggestions

As well as playing music too loudly, the £100 fine can be handed out to drivers shouting, swearing, causing a danger to other road users and making sexual suggestions from a motor vehicle.

The move comes following a public consultation which found that two-thirds of Bradford residents said they felt unsafe on the city’s streets due to poor driving, with many citing nuisance noise as a problem.

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PSPOs are designed to allow police and council officials to address particular nuisance behaviour in areas where it is felt they are having a detrimental effect on the quality of life for the local community.

Affecting safety

The PSPO was approved by councillors on the Regulatory and Appeals Committee earlier this month.

The PSPO also covers behavious such as shouting and swearing from your car. (Picture: Shutterstock)
The PSPO also covers behavious such as shouting and swearing from your car. (Picture: Shutterstock)

Councillor Abdul Jabar, Bradford Council’s executive member for neighbourhoods and community safety, said: “Dangerous, inconsiderate and anti-social vehicle use can have a significant effect on how safe people feel in the district.

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“Without the PSPO, it is difficult for the council or the police to combat anti-social use of a vehicle which does not constitute a breach of a specific motoring law.

“Any action we can take to improve this situation and increase community safety and improve the reputation of the district will be of benefit to residents, visitors and businesses.”

The order will come into effect across the Bradford district on June 1.

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