Nostell Priory: Six of Georgian house's most prized possessions to go on show this autumn

The National Trust has set up new displays to showcase six of its most prized possessions at a Georgian house in Yorkshire.

Curator Simon McCormack pictured with a 17th Century Cabinet which be by the hand of Pierre Gole a furntiure maker to Louis XIV
Curator Simon McCormack pictured with a 17th Century Cabinet which be by the hand of Pierre Gole a furntiure maker to Louis XIV

Visitors will be able to take a close look at the treasures at Nostell Priory, near Wakefield, until the 18th century mansion closes for the winter on October 31.

The exhibition will feature Nostell’s rare 18th century dolls’ house and its most treasured paintings from five artists, master craftsman Thomas Chippendale’s monumental library desk and a 17th century cabinet which have been crafted by Louis XIV’s furniture maker Pierre Gole.

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Nostell’s famous Thomas More painting and the intricately decorated hongs punch bowl will also be on show.

Nostell Priory’s curator, Simon McCormack, said: “The National Trust selected 125 iconic items from within its houses for a special book commemorating the anniversary and six of those are at Nostell, more than any other in the north of England.

“All of these star items and many more treasures are at Nostell due to the Winn family, as part of their endeavours to create a grand and fashionable house.

“This autumn, visitors can see them in a redisplay that highlights their importance, not just to the house, but to our nation’s collective heritage.”

The historic venue’s general manager, Jonathan Brewer, added: “Nostell is one of the North’s best-kept secrets.

“We want people to see, share and shape treasures not just in the house but across Nostell’s 300 acres of land, which includes meadows, woodlands, lakes, a historic stables courtyard, orangery, pleasure grounds, rose garden, menagerie garden and working kitchen garden.

“Visits to Nostell’s house, parkland and gardens help support vital conservation work and new displays such as the six treasures experience, and we’re so grateful to everybody for their support, without which we couldn’t do what we do.”

The estate dates from 1733, and was built for the Winn family on the site of a medieval priory.

The priory and its contents were given to the National Trust in 1953 by the trustees of the estate and Rowland Winn, the Third Baron St Oswald.