Falling Foss: The enchanted tea garden that became one of Yorkshire's quirkiest cafes

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Tucked away in a hidden glade near Whitby is a place where time has stood still.

Falling Foss Tea Garden is a magical wonderland beside a stunningly beautiful waterfall and an 18th-century cottage.

Midge Hall is surrounded by the ancient woodland of Sneaton Forest

Midge Hall is surrounded by the ancient woodland of Sneaton Forest

The cafe may be one of the most unique catering businesses in Yorkshire.

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Owners Jack and Steph Newman renovated Midge Hall, a former gamekeeper's cottage surrounded by the ancient woodland of Sneaton Forest, in 2008 and opened their own secluded paradise.

The building stands at the top of the 30ft cascading falls, which are a huge draw for visitors, who can paddle in the beck below.

The former gamekeeper's cottage was renovated in 2008

The former gamekeeper's cottage was renovated in 2008

The cafe's patrons can enjoy home-made cakes and cream teas while children build dens, explore the fairy dell-themed playground or play pooh sticks from the footbridge - the Newmans even provide the sticks.

Ten minutes' walk away is The Hermitage, a cave carved out of stone with a fascinating history.

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Jack and Steph open the cafe from April until September from 10.30am-4pm.

The 30ft Falling Foss waterfall is beside the tea garden

The 30ft Falling Foss waterfall is beside the tea garden

They were granted a seasonal business licence by the North York Moors National Park in order to protect the tranquility of the beauty spot.

Midge Hall dates from the 1780s and was derelict for years before the couple breathed new life into it.

The Newmans and their three children admitted they were living 'The Good Life' in a 2013 interview with the Yorkshire Post, during which they also expressed concerns over proposals for a potash mine in the area.

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The family get their drinking water from a spring nearby, and have no mains electricity or plumbing.