These shocking photos show the extent of clifftop erosion at Skipsea on the Yorkshire coast

A resident peers over the edge
A resident peers over the edge
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Residents of Skipsea have accepted the inevitable - their homes will fall into the sea.

Skipsea's soft clay cliffs are the fastest-eroding coastline in northern Europe, and since last March 10 metres of land has vanished.

The remains of a clifftop road in Skipsea

The remains of a clifftop road in Skipsea

Gardens, fences and walls regularly fall off the edge, and several roads are now so unsafe that they have been permanently closed.

Meet the Skipsea residents living on the edge
It's thought that 24 homes are at immediate risk, and East Riding Council has called for government funding to help those affected.

These shocking images by Press Association photographer Owen Humphreys shows the extent of the erosion.

On Green Lane, residents claim that around 3ft of the cliff vanishes every month, and they are now used to checking their garden fences every morning. A particularly bad storm could see the properties become dangerous within a year.

The soft clay cliffs are unprotected and vulnerable to erosion

The soft clay cliffs are unprotected and vulnerable to erosion

Skipsea will not be the only settlement between Bridlington and Hull to have been lost to the sea - villages such as Out Newton, Dimlington, Monkwike and Ringborough disappeared long ago.

This is the Yorkshire beach where the cables for Britain's biggest wind farm will be laid
There has been little investment in coastal defences in the Holderness area over the years as it is so sparsely populated. Skirlington and Withernsea are also at risk.

In around 1850, residents of Kilnsea moved their entire village inland and rebuilt the church after erosion became so bad that it exposed bodies in the graveyard.

There was also an important North Sea port called Ravenser Odd that built ships for the royal fleet - but by 1360, it had disappeared completely.

Masonry lies on the beach after falling from gardens along the cliffs

Masonry lies on the beach after falling from gardens along the cliffs

Skipsea has also been threatened by human activity that could have wiped it from the map. In the 1950s, government scientists were looking for a remote area of the country in which to test a new nuclear warhead. An RAF base in Skipsea dating from World War Two was available for purchase, but local opposition was so strong that the plans were eventually abandoned and the weapon was tested in Australia instead.

Skipsea is home to a Cold War monitoring post, which was built on the site of the former airfield in 1959. It was decommissioned in 1991 but has been restored by an enthusiast.

Around 10 metres of coastline has vanished in less than a year

Around 10 metres of coastline has vanished in less than a year