LIVE REVIEW: Good times freaking out as Nile Rodgers and Chic deliver a seaside spectacular

Nile Rodgers delivered a hit packed set. (Photo: Cuffe and Taylor).
Nile Rodgers delivered a hit packed set. (Photo: Cuffe and Taylor).
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He's worked with some of the biggest names in music, enjoyed a string of hits and battled back from what was thought to be terminal cancer, but even when you're disco legend Nile Rodgers, things can still go wrong.

"This has never happened to us before," he yells as a power cut mid-song at Scarborough's Open Air Theatre silences that famous guitar and leaves the 65-year-old icon momentarily struggling as he's left to fill a few awkward moments of stage time as the techies do their job.

Nile Rodgers and Chic performing at Scarborough's Open Air Theatre. (Photo: Cuffe and Taylor).

Nile Rodgers and Chic performing at Scarborough's Open Air Theatre. (Photo: Cuffe and Taylor).

But it just makes an all-singing, all-dancing audience of all ages soaking up the seaside sun love the Chic legend even more with huge cheers erupting as power is eventually brought back.

From the 70s through to the current day, everything the man touches turns to gold and it's one hit after another as Nile straps on that guitar, dubbed the Hitmaker, and leads us through a singalong disco that rapidly becomes the biggest party in town.

From the moment Everybody Dance kicks things off, the instructions for the evening have been firmly laid down and with Dance, Dance, Dance (Yowsah, Yowsah, Yowsah) following, there's no excuse not to get up and strut some seriously funky stuff.

He might be approaching 70, but Nile struts around the stage with effortless cool - how many pensioners do you know who could cut an orange trousers and white suit jacket combo, topped off with dreads and a white beret?

Nile Rogers soldiered on despite a power cut mid song. (Photo: Cuffe and Taylor).

Nile Rogers soldiered on despite a power cut mid song. (Photo: Cuffe and Taylor).

That trademark "chucking" sound is weaved in and out of a vast array of hits with precision - and a medley of Diana Ross and Sister Sledge hits (I'm Coming Out/Upside Down/He's The Greatest Dancer and We Are Family) makes you realise just how many pop classics Rodgers has had a hand in.

Madonna's Like A Virgin (yes, you've guessed it, penned by Nile) shimmers with a new funked up sheen and Duran Duran's Notorious is just heating up nicely when those aforementioned technical gremlins bring things to a shuddering halt.

"Power! Power!," chants a forgiving crowd as the coolest man in rock cracks a few gags waiting for the magic to return.

Fortunately it does, just in time for the most poignant moment of the evening.

He tells the audience how a few years ago, he was told to basically go home and put his affairs in order after being diagnosed with a very aggressive cancer from which there appeared to be no return.

"I decided I was going to write more songs than I'd ever written in my life, do more shows than I'd ever done in my life, do more collaborations than I'd ever done in my life," he says. "And today, I stand before you, cancer free," before launching into a slow version of Get Lucky, his dance hit with French duo Daft Punk, which carried along by the incredible vocals of singer Kimberley Davies, rapidly amps up into a pumping dancefloor filler which bring the house down.

Drummer Ralph Rolle then takes centre stage, leading the audience in chants of 6-1 in reference to England's World Cup demolition of Panama earlier in the day, and firing the band into David Bowie's Let's Dance (of course, also the hand of Rodgers).

It means a rip-roaring finale of Le Freak and Good Times (when Nile invites more than two dozen members of the audience to dance with the band on stage) and even when the rest of the band have departed, our man still shines centre spotlight, playing air guitar and chucking guitar plectrums into the audience, seemingly not wanting to exit the stage, such is the love between performer and audience.

Mention to to DJ and TV favourite Pat Sharp who took to the stage ahead of the show to warm up the audience with a pumping selection of hits from across the decades which set the mood for the evening perfectly.

Dished up with just the right amount of cheese (and with a surprise appearance from Nile himself) mid set, Scarborough had no problem in freaking out to the good times.

Dance, dance, dance? We certainly did Nile.

What an evening.