Leeds church choir boys sexually abused after being groomed by paedophile former primary school teacher

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A former primary school teacher has been locked up for sexually abusing two boys when they were members of a Leeds church choir.

David Crowther was brought to justice more than three decades after her preyed on victims aged 13 and 14 when they were members of the choir at St Luke's Church, Malvern Road, Beeston.

David Crowther was jailed for three years and seven months for sexually abusing two boys from the choir at St Luke's Church, Beeston, during the 1980s.

David Crowther was jailed for three years and seven months for sexually abusing two boys from the choir at St Luke's Church, Beeston, during the 1980s.

Crowther, 78, groomed the youngsters by taking them for days out and buying them gifts before going on to sexually abuse them

Crowther, from Huddersfield, was aged in his forties when he committed the offences in the 1980s.

He befriended the victims and gained their trust by picking them up and taking them to choir practice.

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St Luke's Church, Beeston

St Luke's Church, Beeston

The offences came to light in 2016 when the victims contacted police to report the incidents.

Officers from Leeds District Safeguarding Unit launched an investigation that resulted in Crowther being charged with a total of eleven indecent assaults against the two victims.

He pleaded guilty to the offences when he appeared at Leeds Crown Court and was jailed for three years and seven months.

Crowther has been involved in a range of young people’s activities including youth sports coaching.

He had previously been convicted of five indecent assaults on children between 1973 to 1975 when he was a primary school teacher in Leeds.

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Detective Inspector Kevin Daly, of Leeds District Safeguarding Unit, said: “Crowther abused his position of trust to sexually exploit the two victims who were vulnerable young boys at the time.

“We never underestimate the traumatic impact that such offences have on the victims, particularly when they have had to live with that knowledge for many years before being able to report it.

“We hope it will bring the victims in this case some degree of comfort to know that he has now had to answer for his actions.

"It should also clearly illustrate that the passage of time is no barrier to justice.

“West Yorkshire Police will always treat any allegations of this nature seriously, and we have specialist safeguarding officers who will listen to victims and support them as they progress their investigations.”