West Yorkshire Police officers can now display their tattoos under U-turn on uniform policy

A change in the rules over police officers displaying their tattoos has come into effect
A change in the rules over police officers displaying their tattoos has come into effect
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Officers with tattoos are now able to work with them on display thanks to a reverse in police's cover up policy.

West Yorkshire Police staff were formerly prohibited from having tattoos on show due to uniform rules.

Officers are now able to display tattoos on their hands and necks, although tattooed arms remained banned from being displayed

Officers are now able to display tattoos on their hands and necks, although tattooed arms remained banned from being displayed

But a relax in the regulations now means officers will be able to display their ink, provided they are small and inoffensive.

A statement issued by the West Yorkshire Police Federation on Thursday announced the change in policy, revealing it had come about after 18 months of lobbying.

The Federation said: "Thanks to 18 months of lobbying from West Yorkshire Police Federation, that policy has been eased meaning officer’s arm tattoos can be on display on duty, providing they are not in any way offensive."

Tattooed arms however must remain covered up, but "small, inoffensive and non-prominent" designs on officers' hands and necks are allowed.

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A survey completed by 1,182 officers last year revealed the majority back a change in the rules, with more than 80% saying they felt colleagues should be allowed to display inoffensive tattoos.

West Yorkshire Police Federation General Secretary Guy King said: “It has taken some considerable time and effort, but the force has agreed to change the policy on tattoos. They have listened to the case, and from today, West Yorkshire Police Officers can now show openly show their tattoos.

“This brings West Yorkshire in line with what is accepted in most other forces around the country.

“The decision to change the policy comes after continued pressure from the Federation over the last 18 months and we have long argued that the policy was bizarre and unfair, as small and non-prominent tattoos on the hands and neck were allowed to be shown but all others must be covered.

“It brings us in line with what is widely accepted within society at large and reflects the modern, diverse workforce we have, and I’d like to thank CC Robins and his command team for listening to officers.”