'Dislocated fingers are not going to make me give up', Knaresborough cyclist's new challenge after serious accident

Grahame Dalby is aiming to raise at least 1,000 for the charity five months after the accident
Grahame Dalby is aiming to raise at least 1,000 for the charity five months after the accident
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Despite still carrying injuries from a serious cycling accident a Knaresborough man is preparing to undertake a marathon challenge for charity.

Grahame Dalby is aiming to raise at least £1,000 by cycling more than 120 miles from Noirmoutier-en-l'Île to Fontenay-le-Comte in France, as part of Prostate Cancer UK's Grand depart 1st Stage on June 23, which follows the Tour de France route.

He badly dislocated two of his fingers on his left hand in the accident

He badly dislocated two of his fingers on his left hand in the accident

He is preparing to begin his training this week whilst still attending weekly physiotherapy for two badly dislocated fingers. Five months ago Mr Dalby skidded into a wall while going roughly 20mph on Red Brae Bank in Nidderdale, which also saw him sustain a cracked rib and injuries to one of his eyes.

He said: "I was doing a coast to coast charity ride in aid of Prostate Cancer UK and St Leonards Hospice, the weather was pretty bad and I was caught out on a bend, I skidded and ended up going sideways into the wall."

He added:"This is a once in a lifetime challenge, not many people can say they did the Tour De France route and it's a chance to raise money for Prostate Cancer UK. Dislocated fingers are not going to make me give up."

Prior to the accident Mr Dalby had not cycled more than 40 miles but is determined to take on this new challenge as the cause is close to his heart.

His father in law. Raymond Harwood, died of the disease aged 72 in 2007 after serving as a volunteer firefighter for more than 20 years.

Mr Dalby said: "I am passionate about raising money and awareness for this worthy cause because of how many men are affected by this terrible disease. There is hope for treatment if it is caught in time, but often it is too late as was the case with my father-in-law.

"He was such a good person, and did so much for the community of Knaresborough as a volunteer fireman."

You can donate towards his fund-raising page here