Leeds students jump for joy after A-level results

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STUDENTS across Leeds are celebrating success in their A-level exams.

Roundhay School student Seamus Breen’s ambition of becoming a doctor is on track after he achieved four A* grades in chemistry, biology, maths and further maths.

Catherine Thompson, Ellie Archibald, Olivia Birch. Amy-Leigh King, Eric Mobbs and Shay Breen, students at Roundhay School, Leeds celebrate their fantastic A-level results. Picture Tony Johnson.

Catherine Thompson, Ellie Archibald, Olivia Birch. Amy-Leigh King, Eric Mobbs and Shay Breen, students at Roundhay School, Leeds celebrate their fantastic A-level results. Picture Tony Johnson.

Seamus, 18 said he has been revising since February but didn’t expect to do so well, adding: “I was pretty shocked but really happy.”

Seamus has secured place at Queen Mary University in London to study medicine and wants to become a doctor.

His mother Rozina Breen, said: “He has worked really hard and got the grades he deserves. It reflects his ambition, determination and hard work.

“I’m tremendously proud that he has gone to a Leeds state school and got involved and decided that he wanted to pursue the A levels that he did and the career he wants.”

Seamus Breen

Seamus Breen

Sarah Billinge, head of sixth form at Roundhay School, said: “We are absolutely delighted by Seamus’s success.

“We wish him the very best of luck for a successful medical career.”

Woodkirk Academy at Tingley said 57 per cent of all grades awarded were A and B grades and there was a pass rate of 98.4 per cent of students.

A total of 64 per cent of A-level students at John Smeaton Academy in East Leeds achieved A* to C grades.

Leeds Grammar School students celebrating A-level results

Leeds Grammar School students celebrating A-level results

They included student Harry Tran, who achieved an A* in chemistry, an A in maths and an A in physics and will now study medicinal chemistry at the University of Leeds.

St Mary’s Menston said more than 90 per cent of A-level students who applied have secured a place at a university of their choice.

Horsforth School is celebrating another record breaking year of A-level results after 42 per cent of students achieved three A levels at grades A* to B.

At Guiseley School, 29 per cent of students achieved three or more A* to A grades, with more than 88 per cent achieving three grades between A* to C.

St Mary's Menston students after receiving their A-level results

St Mary's Menston students after receiving their A-level results

Notre Dame Catholic Sixth Form College said two out of three students achieved a high A-level grade.

Three students from The Grammar School at Leeds are celebrating a clean sweep of four A*s at A-level.

Tamanna Dasanjh and Theo Tobias – both from Alwoodley – and Will Thornton from Adel, all scooped the top grades this year.

Tamanna and Theo both achieved A*s in chemistry, maths, further maths and physics while Will achieved his in biology, chemistry, maths and physics.

All three plan to study physics. Tamanna and Theo are heading to Durham University while Will is going to Imperial College, London.

A total of 100 students at The Grammar School at Leeds achieved ABB, the coveted grades required by leading universities.

Of these students, 54 picked up the top grades of A*/A with 15 scooping all A*s.

Three of the 15 who swept the board with the top grade, achieved four A*s and a further 12 achieved three A*s.

Head girl Lexy Shipley is heading for Oxford after achieving three A*s in her A-levels. She will study medicine at Worcester College.

Lexy, from Alwoodley, achieved straight A*s in biology, chemistry and maths.

The Grammar School at Leeds principal Sue Woodroofe said: “Our students have achieved a superb set of results and their dedication and diligence has been impressive."

Nathan Strathdee is one of four Horsforth School students who achieved four A* grades.

Nathan has won a place at The University of Sheffield and will be studying engineering.

A record 42 per cent of Horsforth School students achieved three A levels at A* to B

Notre Dame Catholic Sixth Form College student Amy Kitchingham is set to study English at the University of Cambridge after achieving four A* A-levels.

Amy got four A* grades in A-level English language, English literature, history and EPQ.

Beth Dillon was one of 14 Guiseley School students who achieved straight A grades in all their A–level subjects.

Beth achieved A* grades in biology, politics and history and an A in chemistry. She will study medicine at Glasgow University.

Leeds City Council said it is still collecting results from across the city, but provisional results from schools suggest an increase in average points per A-Level entry equivalent to an average of a grade C.

Coun Jonathan Pryor, Leeds City Council’s executive board member for learning, skills and employment, said: “I would like to congratulate everyone who received their A-level and other post 16 results today.

“These results demonstrate a lot of hard work, effort and determination as well as the high quality of teaching in our schools."

The proportion of A-level entries awarded top grades rose to its highest level for six years, with more than one in four students gaining an A or A*.

Figures show the A* to A pass-rate for the UK has risen for the second year in a row.

In total, 26.4 per cent of UK entries were given one of the two top grades – up 0.1 percentage point on 2017, according to data published by the Joint Council for Qualifications.

It is the highest percentage since 2012, according to Press Association analysis.

The results in England, Wales and Northern Ireland come after a major overhaul of the qualifications in England.

AS-levels have been hived off to form a standalone qualification and there has been a move away from coursework and modular exams.

Grades have been awarded for the first time this year for new A-levels in languages, geography, dance, drama and theatre, music, PE and religious studies.

Exams regulator Ofqual said it has processes in place to ensure results are comparable with last year, and no students are disadvantaged by being the first to sit reformed qualifications.

Education Secretary Damian Hinds rejected suggestions that the changes meant students were not able to fully demonstrate their abilities.

He said: “Reformed A-levels help to prepare young people better for what comes next, which for many of them will be going to university and for others, other routes of further study.”

Mr Hinds added: “Doing A-levels is a complete course over two years, and without having to do public exams at the end of the lower sixth year, that does enable you to look at the subject as a whole.”