At the eleventh hour, Harry leads nation in remembering our fallen

Prince Harry has led the country in remembering the fallen on Armistice Day, laying a wreath at the National Memorial Arboretum.

Prince Harry attending a Service of Remembrance at the Armed Forces Memorial at the National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.

Yorkshire, in common with the rest of the country, fell silent at 11am, exactly 96 years since the armistice that brought to an end the Great War, was signed.

Harry, 32, attended a Remembrance Service at the Armed Forces Memorial alongside veterans and representatives of the Army, Royal Navy, and RAF.

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After paying his respects, he read aloud a poem, The Soldier, by the First World War poet Rupert Brooke.

Members of the British Legion and the public observe a two minute silence in Leeds on Armistice Day.

Harry served for 10 years in the Army, and was twice deployed to Afghanistan.

As people fell silent at commemorations across the UK, Harry joined senior military personnel, veterans and members of the public at the arboretum in Alrewas, Staffordshire, for a service held within the walls of the national Armed Forces Memorial.

The memorial is designed so that on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month a shaft of sunlight dissects its inner and outer walls, hitting a bronze wreath sculpture.

Lieutenant Colonel David Whimpenny, chairman of the National Memorial Arboretum and trustee of its parent charity, The Royal British Legion, said: “Today, led by Prince Harry, we paid tribute to the servicemen and women that have sacrificed their lives for their country, from the First World War to the current day.”

Some of the hundreds of hand-painted pebbles at the foot of the Tommy Statue in Seaham, Co Durham

Prince Harry also took the salute during a parade of current serving personnel and veterans at the event, which concluded with a flypast of Squirrel HT1 helicopters from the Defence Helicopter Flying School at RAF Shawbury in Shropshire.

Both Prince Harry and the Duke of Cambridge trained at RAF Shawbury and flew Squirrel helicopters as part of their course.

In Leeds, hundreds gathered for a service at the city’s Cenotaph.

David Marshall, chairman of the Leeds Royal British Legion, and the Reverend Canon Sam Corley addressed the crowd before wreaths of poppies were laid at the foot of the memorial and a bugler played the Last Post to mark the start of the two-minute silence.

Laura Wright throws poppies in the fountain during an event in London's Trafalgar Square to mark Armistice Day.

Following the silent tribute, standard bearers led dignitaries to a new poppy-themed bench, which has been temporarily installed near the war memorial in Victoria Gardens.

The bench is one of two donated by 102-year-old veteran Joe Morton, who served with the Royal Army Service Corps, as a tribute to those who have lost their lives serving in the armed forces.

Councillor Gerry Harper, the Lord Mayor of Leeds, said: “The donation of two poppy-themed benches by Joe, who is a 102-year-old veteran, is a wonderful gesture and we were very keen for one of the tributes to be placed on Victoria Gardens to mark both the Armistice Day and Remembrance Sunday services.

“The turnout from the people of Leeds to the Armistice Day service was, as always, tremendous.”

Dignitaries observe a two minute silence outside Belfast City Hall on Armistice Day.
Members of the public throw poppies in the fountain during an event in London's Trafalgar Square
Members of the British Legion and the public observe a two minute silence in Leeds on Armistice Day.
Some of the hundreds of hand-painted pebbles at the foot of the Tommy Statue in Seaham, Co Durham
Laura Wright throws poppies in the fountain during an event in London's Trafalgar Square to mark Armistice Day.
Dignitaries observe a two minute silence outside Belfast City Hall on Armistice Day.
Members of the public throw poppies in the fountain during an event in London's Trafalgar Square