Five things to know about today’s news in Yorkshire

Don't have time to read this morning's paper? We've got you covered Gareth Fuller/PA Wire
Don't have time to read this morning's paper? We've got you covered Gareth Fuller/PA Wire

Don’t have the time to read the news in the morning?

No worries, here’s a review of today’s key headlines in Yorkshire.

1. Ukip candidate hurt but aide says MEP ‘did not touch him’

Ukip has been plunged into a fresh crisis after leadership favourite Steven Woolfe was taken to hospital following an “altercation” with another of the party’s MEPs. The 49-year-old collapsed and underwent a brain scan following reports of a confrontation with Yorkshire and Humber MEP Mike Hookem at the European Parliament in Strasbourg. However, a spokesman for 62-year-old Mr Hookem - a former Commando Engineer - denied a physical fight took place, saying: “Mike did not touch him.” Party leader Nigel Farage has ordered an inquiry into the incident, which comes days after the shock resignation of newly-elected leader Diane James.

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2. The stone age Rover and his long, long walkies

New research suggests that dogs and humans have had a strong bond since prehistoric times. Evidence of the earliest journey in British history has been uncovered which shows that a pet dog accompanied prehistoric men along a gruelling 250-mile trip from York to Stonehenge in Wiltshire. Archaeologist David Jacques says he has found evidence that shows the Mesolithic men had Alsatians with them. Bones found nearby suggest the dog would have feasted on salmon, trout, pike, wild pig, and red deer.

Read more in today’s Yorkshire Post

3. Patrols to stop terror boats are ‘unlikely to succeed’

Patrols aimed at preventing terrorists entering the UK in small boats are “extremely unlikely” to succeed unless backed up by land-based officers targeting remote landing sites, a leading maritime security expert has warned. The growing threat of terrorist strikes on mainland Britain has intensified in recent months in the wake of atrocities in western Europe, such as the Paris attacks in November last year and the coordinated suicide bombings in the Belgium capital of Brussels in March. Security service officials from MI5 have placed the UK on a heightened state of alert, with the current level of threat of international terrorism deemed to be severe. But Graeme Brooks, the chief executive officer of Dryad Maritime warned yesterday that the use of patrol boats and search aircraft roaming the sea was difficult and unlikely to produce results.

Read more in today’s Yorkshire Post

4. City landmarks bathed in mesmerising light displays

A digital waterfall towering 100ft and a magical forest of giant illuminated dandelions - Leeds Light Night dazzled onlookers on opening night. Candy-coloured creations bathed city centre landmarks in glowing hues for a spectacular start to the event which is taking place over two days for the first time in its 12-year history. Projected onto The Queens Hotel, ‘The Falls’ explores the flow and form of water, while ‘The Phoenix and the Stone’ on the Civic Hall shows a gigantic mythical bird which represents the uniting of four elemental forces and symbolises the different parts of Yorkshire working together with Leeds at their heart. Leeds may be famed for its successful triathlete brothers, but the Brownlees will never have known a light triathlon like what took place last night - involving a parade of lanterns, street theatre and stilt walkers, and a parade of brightly lit cyclists carrying glow sticks.

Read more in today’s Yorkshire Post

5. Campaign fears for ‘dangerous precedent’ as fracking approved

Campaigners are urging the Government to consider each fracking case on its own merit as an appeal is passed in Lancashire to overturn a local authority decision. The plans, to frack for shale gas and build up to four wells at a site in Fylde, had initially been refused by Lancashire County Council following a wave of opposition. But, after an appeal to Communities Secretary Sajid Javid, the plans have now been given the go-ahead, sparking fears over a “worrying” precedent. The Lancashire plans, passed yesterday, are from gas company Cuadrilla to frack between Preston and Blackpool.

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