Five things you probably didn't know about the St George’s Day Festival in Morley

Last year's event. PIC: Asadour Guzelian
Last year's event. PIC: Asadour Guzelian
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Thousands of people are expected to turn out for what has is thought to be the biggest St George's Day celebration in all the country later today.

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Last year's event. PIC: Asadour Guzelian

Last year's event. PIC: Asadour Guzelian

The fun kicks off at around 11.30am on Sunday, April 22 when the parade, lead by St George on horseback, leaves Morley town hall to make its way up to the Morley rugby and cricket clubs.

The National Anthem will be played by the West Yorkshire Fire Brigade and Rescue band before game between junior rugby clubs take place.

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At 2.30pm there will be a World War battle re-enactment and a brass band will entertain the crowd in the afternoon.

Stalls, charity organisations and food and refreshment stalls will all be in attendance.

Five things you probably didn't know about Morley's St George's Day Festival:

1. The weekend-long festival parade began in 2005 and is thought to be the biggest St George’s Day celebration in the country, giving Morley the title of ‘England’s most patriotic town.’

2. It is organised by the Leeds branch of the Society of St George and the focal point is a parade by St George on horseback from the town hall to the sports ground. A dragon is then slain.

3. The event is hugely popular and attracts over 20,000 visitors. Activities include archery, re-enactments, medieval combat displays, music and the singing of the national anthem.

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4. Morley has resisted offers by Leeds for the city to host the festival in future years, with organisers saying its host town is ‘non-negotiable’ and that it will not re-locate.

5. Morley residents believe it is the biggest event in the town since the Queen visited in 1954, drawing huge crowds. On both occasions the streets were bedecked with flags and bunting.