How driving in certain types of footwear could INVALIDATE your car insurance

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After last week's tropical temperatures it's only natural that the summer clothes came out of the wardrobe, even if they've not been used so far this week...

-> Yorkshire director filmed giving middle finger to speed cameras and using 'laser jammer' on Range Rover
Out came the shorts, t-shirts and vests, but did you pull out your flip flops and sandals too?

Driving in flip flops could cost you...

Driving in flip flops could cost you...

If you did, make sure you take care if you're planning on wearing them while driving.

Motorists are being reminded to take care about the footwear they opt for when going out in the car.

It isn't illegal to wear flip flops, sandals, or even to go barefoot while behind the wheel, as long as they still have proper control over the vehicle.

BUT, the footwear is not allowed to impact on the way a car is driven and if it does, then there can be repercussions.

If you put you, yourself, passengers or other motorists in danger due to your footwear, it will then become illegal.

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TIPS FROM THE RAC ON CHOOSING THE PERFECT FOOTWEAR:

Have a sole no thicker than 10mm

but the sole should not be too thin or soft.

Provide enough grip to stop your foot slipping off the pedals.

Not be too heavy.

Not limit ankle movement.

Be narrow enough to avoid accidentally depressing two pedals at once.

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The RAC website continues: "This does technically categorise some types of footwear – such as high-heels and flip-flops – unsuitable for piloting a car.

"While light, flimsy and impractical footwear can be dangerous, so can sturdy, robust shoes, such as walking or snow boots.

"It’s important to have a good base and grip to apply pressure to the pedals, but you need a certain degree of finesse to manipulate the controls. If not, you could strike the brake and accelerator together, producing a heart-in-mouth incident."