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Hundreds of Doncaster Amazon workers set to receive pay rise

Amazon workers in Doncaster are set to receive pay rises after the firm announce wage increases for lower paid workers.

The online retailing giant, which has several huge depots in Doncaster, is raising pay for hundreds of thousands of workers in the US and the UK.

Amazon in Doncaster

Amazon in Doncaster

Amazon's lowest paid US workers will receive $15 an hour. In the UK, pay will rise from £8.20 an hour in London to £10.50, while outside London the rate rises from £8 an hour to £9.50.

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The move will benefit 250,000 workers in the US, 17,000 in the UK and tens of thousands of seasonal workers.

“We’re excited to announce Amazon is raising our minimum wage for all full-time, part-time, seasonal, and temporary UK employees, effective from November 1,” said Doug Gurr of Amazon UK.

“This will impact more than 37,000 employees across the country, resulting in higher pay for them and their families.”

Amazon is one of the biggest companies in the world, worth about $1 trillion.

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However, it has been attacked by campaigners - and US President Donald Trump - for the amount of tax it pays.

The company has also been criticised for its employment practices, with complaints over working conditions in its warehouses.

Its founder, Jeff Bezos, is the world's richest man, with a fortune estimated at some $150bn.

The new pay rates start on 1 November, and will apply to all staff, full and part-time, as well as temporary and seasonal workers.

Amazon's move comes after widespread strikes by workers across Europe.

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This summer, workers took industrial action to coincide with the internet retail giant's Prime promotion event. Staff at warehouses in Germany Spain and Poland were trying to force the firm to offer better working conditions.

Mr Bezos said: "We listened to our critics, thought hard about what we wanted to do, and decided we want to lead.

"We're excited about this change and encourage our competitors and other large employers to join us."