Flood warnings remain in place across Yorkshire after weekend downpour

A member of staff from the Kings Arms in York jumps across flood water after the River Ouse bursts its banks. (Danny Lawson/PA Wire).
A member of staff from the Kings Arms in York jumps across flood water after the River Ouse bursts its banks. (Danny Lawson/PA Wire).
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Parts of North Yorkshire are still at risk of flooding after rain battered Yorkshire this weekend.

Water levels remain high on the rivers Ouse, Nidd, Swale and Ure, according to the Environment Agency (EA). They have warned people not to use roads and footpaths near waterways.

Twelve flood warnings remain in place across North Yorkshire.

Water levels on the River Ouse in York city centre have been rising throughout the morning and currently stand at just under 4m. The Foss Barrier and other flood gates in York have been closed.

Homes, business and farmland were affected over the weekend as rivers burst their banks following 12 hours of torrential rain.

Tadcaster Albion’s pitch was completely submerged after the River Wharfe burst its banks.

Water had to be pumped away to protect homes in Sowerby Bridge as the River Calder overflowed.

A farmer near Malham posted dramatic footage of his sheep being herded out of lambing sheds as they began to fill with water, while a group of Leeds United fans were filmed wading through the River Ribble, near Whernside, during the severe conditions.

Firefighters also had to deal with vehicles trapped by flooding in Otley.

The Environment Agency said yesterday: "We have seen localised flooding in the Calder Valley, the Greater Manchester area, York and along the River Severn.

"River levels in some areas will continue to rise over the next few days in response to recent rainfall, however the outlook is for increasingly settled and dry conditions which will allow river levels to fall quickly in all but the slowest responding rivers.

"We have officers out on the ground checking defences, clearing drainage channels and supporting affected communities."